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Title: Three interfering beams in laser Doppler velocimetry for particle position and microflow velocity profile measurements

Abstract

It is proposed to use three interfering and coplanar laser beams to form the probe volume of laser Doppler systems. This allows us to obtain, for each particle crossing this probe volume, a Doppler signal whose frequency amplitude spectrum exhibits two characteristic peaks. Electromagnetic calculations and experimental validations clearly demonstrate that we can estimate simultaneously, from the analysis of these two frequency peaks, the particle position along the optical axis and one velocity component. This technique is expected to have great potentialities for velocity profile measurements in microfluidic or boundary layer flows, as well as for the sizing of spherical particles.

Authors:
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20779331
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Applied Optics; Journal Volume: 45; Journal Issue: 14; Other Information: DOI: 10.1364/AO.45.003317; (c) 2006 Optical Society of America; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; AMPLITUDES; BOUNDARY LAYERS; DOPPLER EFFECT; INTERFEROMETRY; LASERS; LIGHT SCATTERING; PARTICLES; REMOTE SENSING; SIGNALS; SPECTRA; VALIDATION; VELOCITY

Citation Formats

Onofri, Fabrice. Three interfering beams in laser Doppler velocimetry for particle position and microflow velocity profile measurements. United States: N. p., 2006. Web. doi:10.1364/AO.45.0.
Onofri, Fabrice. Three interfering beams in laser Doppler velocimetry for particle position and microflow velocity profile measurements. United States. doi:10.1364/AO.45.0.
Onofri, Fabrice. Wed . "Three interfering beams in laser Doppler velocimetry for particle position and microflow velocity profile measurements". United States. doi:10.1364/AO.45.0.
@article{osti_20779331,
title = {Three interfering beams in laser Doppler velocimetry for particle position and microflow velocity profile measurements},
author = {Onofri, Fabrice},
abstractNote = {It is proposed to use three interfering and coplanar laser beams to form the probe volume of laser Doppler systems. This allows us to obtain, for each particle crossing this probe volume, a Doppler signal whose frequency amplitude spectrum exhibits two characteristic peaks. Electromagnetic calculations and experimental validations clearly demonstrate that we can estimate simultaneously, from the analysis of these two frequency peaks, the particle position along the optical axis and one velocity component. This technique is expected to have great potentialities for velocity profile measurements in microfluidic or boundary layer flows, as well as for the sizing of spherical particles.},
doi = {10.1364/AO.45.0},
journal = {Applied Optics},
number = 14,
volume = 45,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed May 10 00:00:00 EDT 2006},
month = {Wed May 10 00:00:00 EDT 2006}
}
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