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Title: Holographic optical trapping

Abstract

Holographic optical tweezers use computer-generated holograms to create arbitrary three-dimensional configurations of single-beam optical traps that are useful for capturing, moving, and transforming mesoscopic objects. Through a combination of beam-splitting, mode-forming, and adaptive wavefront correction, holographic traps can exert precisely specified and characterized forces and torques on objects ranging in size from a few nanometers to hundreds of micrometers. Offering nanometer-scale spatial resolution and real-time reconfigurability, holographic optical traps provide unsurpassed access to the microscopic world and have found applications in fundamental research, manufacturing, and materials processing.

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20779266
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Applied Optics; Journal Volume: 45; Journal Issue: 5; Other Information: DOI: 10.1364/AO.45.000880; (c) 2006 Optical Society of America; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; BEAM SPLITTING; COMPUTERS; COOLING; CORRECTIONS; HOLOGRAPHY; OPTICS; SPATIAL RESOLUTION; THREE-DIMENSIONAL CALCULATIONS; TORQUE; TRAPPING; TRAPS

Citation Formats

Grier, David G., and Roichman, Yael. Holographic optical trapping. United States: N. p., 2006. Web. doi:10.1364/AO.45.0.
Grier, David G., & Roichman, Yael. Holographic optical trapping. United States. doi:10.1364/AO.45.0.
Grier, David G., and Roichman, Yael. Fri . "Holographic optical trapping". United States. doi:10.1364/AO.45.0.
@article{osti_20779266,
title = {Holographic optical trapping},
author = {Grier, David G. and Roichman, Yael},
abstractNote = {Holographic optical tweezers use computer-generated holograms to create arbitrary three-dimensional configurations of single-beam optical traps that are useful for capturing, moving, and transforming mesoscopic objects. Through a combination of beam-splitting, mode-forming, and adaptive wavefront correction, holographic traps can exert precisely specified and characterized forces and torques on objects ranging in size from a few nanometers to hundreds of micrometers. Offering nanometer-scale spatial resolution and real-time reconfigurability, holographic optical traps provide unsurpassed access to the microscopic world and have found applications in fundamental research, manufacturing, and materials processing.},
doi = {10.1364/AO.45.0},
journal = {Applied Optics},
number = 5,
volume = 45,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Feb 10 00:00:00 EST 2006},
month = {Fri Feb 10 00:00:00 EST 2006}
}
  • Real-time dynamic holographic optical tweezers suffer from an intrinsic limitation. The diffractive optical element, which is the key to reconstruction, requires time for the calculation and physical constraints to be satisfied. In particular,when working in a volume these requirements become highly expensive. Quadrant kinoform represents an alternative to traditional 3D holograms.A spatial domain multiplexing combined with lens term phase profiles allow the independent addressing and control of different planes in the reconstruction volume.The bidimensional holograms used pose less severe physical constraints and the reduced size leads, at the cost of a lower reconstruction resolution, to a consistent speedup in themore » computation time thus improving real-time interactions.« less
  • Two novel superresolving scanning microscopes, one of which uses coherent imaging and the other incoherent imaging, are described. The optical arrangement used int he coherent microscope is similar to that in a scanning confocal microscope with the detector pinhole replaced by a special holographic mask, a Fourier lens, and a pinhole. The incoherent design uses two intensity-transmittance masks, two integrating detectors, and an electronic subtractor. The design of the microscopes is based on the results of singular-system theory, and the mask forms are calculated by means of this analysis. These arrangements obviate the need for an array of detectors tomore » implement singular-system processing, and in the coherent case direct phase measurement is no longer required. Experimental results are presented that demonstrate a significant resolution improvement for a one-dimensional low-numerical-aperture coherent microscope. 15 refs., 3 figs.« less
  • This paper formulates the requirements imposed on systems for correcting the phase-difference distribution of recording waves over the field of a large-diameter photographic plate ({le}1.5 m) when writing holographic optical elements (HOEs). A technique is proposed for writing large HOEs, based on the use of an adaptive phase-correction optical system of the first type, controlled by the self-diffraction signal from a latent image. The technique is implemented by writing HOEs on photographic plates with an effective diameter of 0.7 m on As{sub 2}S{sub 3} layers. 13 refs., 4 figs.