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Title: Dual beam experiment for simultaneous irradiation of surfaces with ion species of gaseous and solid-state elements

Abstract

The effects occurring under simultaneous bombardment of surfaces by ions of gaseous and solid elements is a new field for research, which is of great interest for applications ranging from cold plasma technologies to nuclear fusion in magnetically confined plasmas. A multitude of new effects has been observed originating from mixing of incident ion species and bulk material at the surface and, in some cases, from additional complex chemical interactions between the mixing species. To study these effects under controlled conditions a new dual beam experiment has been commissioned, particularly suited for in situ studies of surface sputtering and ion implantation processes. Thin films with negligible impurity level and surface roughness are used as targets. High energy ion beam analysis is used as a means of nondestructive elemental depth profiling and concentration measurements. This allows for the first time the fast quantification of the elemental composition change of a target sample in intervals between ion irradiation. The article describes the details of design and operation, as well as the accessible range of experimental conditions.

Authors:
;  [1];  [2]
  1. Faculty of Physics and Technologies, Kharkiv National University, 31 Kurchatov Avenue Kharkiv 61108 (Ukraine) and Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, Boltzmannstrasse 2, D 85748 Garching (Germany)
  2. (Germany)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20779193
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Review of Scientific Instruments; Journal Volume: 77; Journal Issue: 4; Other Information: DOI: 10.1063/1.2190207; (c) 2006 American Institute of Physics; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; COLD PLASMA; DESIGN; IMPURITIES; ION BEAMS; ION IMPLANTATION; IRRADIATION; OPERATION; ROUGHNESS; SOLIDS; SPUTTERING; SURFACES; THIN FILMS

Citation Formats

Bizyukov, I., Krieger, K., and Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, Boltzmannstrasse 2, D 85748 Garching. Dual beam experiment for simultaneous irradiation of surfaces with ion species of gaseous and solid-state elements. United States: N. p., 2006. Web. doi:10.1063/1.2190207.
Bizyukov, I., Krieger, K., & Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, Boltzmannstrasse 2, D 85748 Garching. Dual beam experiment for simultaneous irradiation of surfaces with ion species of gaseous and solid-state elements. United States. doi:10.1063/1.2190207.
Bizyukov, I., Krieger, K., and Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, Boltzmannstrasse 2, D 85748 Garching. Sat . "Dual beam experiment for simultaneous irradiation of surfaces with ion species of gaseous and solid-state elements". United States. doi:10.1063/1.2190207.
@article{osti_20779193,
title = {Dual beam experiment for simultaneous irradiation of surfaces with ion species of gaseous and solid-state elements},
author = {Bizyukov, I. and Krieger, K. and Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, Boltzmannstrasse 2, D 85748 Garching},
abstractNote = {The effects occurring under simultaneous bombardment of surfaces by ions of gaseous and solid elements is a new field for research, which is of great interest for applications ranging from cold plasma technologies to nuclear fusion in magnetically confined plasmas. A multitude of new effects has been observed originating from mixing of incident ion species and bulk material at the surface and, in some cases, from additional complex chemical interactions between the mixing species. To study these effects under controlled conditions a new dual beam experiment has been commissioned, particularly suited for in situ studies of surface sputtering and ion implantation processes. Thin films with negligible impurity level and surface roughness are used as targets. High energy ion beam analysis is used as a means of nondestructive elemental depth profiling and concentration measurements. This allows for the first time the fast quantification of the elemental composition change of a target sample in intervals between ion irradiation. The article describes the details of design and operation, as well as the accessible range of experimental conditions.},
doi = {10.1063/1.2190207},
journal = {Review of Scientific Instruments},
number = 4,
volume = 77,
place = {United States},
year = {Sat Apr 15 00:00:00 EDT 2006},
month = {Sat Apr 15 00:00:00 EDT 2006}
}
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