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Title: Controlling field-effect mobility in pentacene-based transistors by supersonic molecular-beam deposition

Abstract

We show that pentacene field-effect transistors, fabricated by supersonic molecular beams, have a performance strongly depending on the precursor's kinetic energy (K{sub E}). The major role played by K{sub E} is in achieving highly ordered and flat films. In the range K{sub E}{approx_equal}3.5-6.5 eV, the organic field effect transistor linear mobility increases of a factor {approx}5. The highest value (1.0 cm{sup 2} V{sup -1} s{sup -1}) corresponds to very uniform and flat films (layer-by-layer type growth). The temperature dependence of mobility for films grown at K{sub E}>6 eV recalls that of single crystals (bandlike) and shows an opposite trend for films grown at K{sub E}{<=}5.5 eV.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ;  [1];  [2]
  1. IFN-CNR, Istituto Fotonica e Nanotecnologie, ITC Division, 38050 Trento (Italy)
  2. (Italy)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20779144
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Applied Physics Letters; Journal Volume: 88; Journal Issue: 13; Other Information: DOI: 10.1063/1.2187494; (c) 2006 American Institute of Physics; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; CRYSTAL GROWTH; DEPOSITION; ELECTRON MOBILITY; EV RANGE 01-10; FIELD EFFECT TRANSISTORS; KINETIC ENERGY; LAYERS; MOLECULAR BEAM EPITAXY; MOLECULAR BEAMS; MONOCRYSTALS; ORGANIC SEMICONDUCTORS; PENTACENE; PRECURSOR; TEMPERATURE DEPENDENCE; THIN FILMS

Citation Formats

Toccoli, T., Pallaoro, A., Coppede, N., Iannotta, S., De Angelis, F., Mariucci, L., Fortunato, G., and IFN-CNR, Istituto Fotonica e Nanotecnologie, 00156 Rome. Controlling field-effect mobility in pentacene-based transistors by supersonic molecular-beam deposition. United States: N. p., 2006. Web. doi:10.1063/1.2187494.
Toccoli, T., Pallaoro, A., Coppede, N., Iannotta, S., De Angelis, F., Mariucci, L., Fortunato, G., & IFN-CNR, Istituto Fotonica e Nanotecnologie, 00156 Rome. Controlling field-effect mobility in pentacene-based transistors by supersonic molecular-beam deposition. United States. doi:10.1063/1.2187494.
Toccoli, T., Pallaoro, A., Coppede, N., Iannotta, S., De Angelis, F., Mariucci, L., Fortunato, G., and IFN-CNR, Istituto Fotonica e Nanotecnologie, 00156 Rome. Mon . "Controlling field-effect mobility in pentacene-based transistors by supersonic molecular-beam deposition". United States. doi:10.1063/1.2187494.
@article{osti_20779144,
title = {Controlling field-effect mobility in pentacene-based transistors by supersonic molecular-beam deposition},
author = {Toccoli, T. and Pallaoro, A. and Coppede, N. and Iannotta, S. and De Angelis, F. and Mariucci, L. and Fortunato, G. and IFN-CNR, Istituto Fotonica e Nanotecnologie, 00156 Rome},
abstractNote = {We show that pentacene field-effect transistors, fabricated by supersonic molecular beams, have a performance strongly depending on the precursor's kinetic energy (K{sub E}). The major role played by K{sub E} is in achieving highly ordered and flat films. In the range K{sub E}{approx_equal}3.5-6.5 eV, the organic field effect transistor linear mobility increases of a factor {approx}5. The highest value (1.0 cm{sup 2} V{sup -1} s{sup -1}) corresponds to very uniform and flat films (layer-by-layer type growth). The temperature dependence of mobility for films grown at K{sub E}>6 eV recalls that of single crystals (bandlike) and shows an opposite trend for films grown at K{sub E}{<=}5.5 eV.},
doi = {10.1063/1.2187494},
journal = {Applied Physics Letters},
number = 13,
volume = 88,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Mar 27 00:00:00 EST 2006},
month = {Mon Mar 27 00:00:00 EST 2006}
}
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