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Title: In-line interferometer for direction-sensitive displacement measurements by optical feedback detection

Abstract

We demonstrate a compact in-line interferometer for direction-sensitive displacement measurement by optical feedback detection with a semiconductor laser (SL) light source. Two reflected beams from a semitransparent reference mirror and a reflecting test object interfere in the SL medium, causing a variation in its output power. The reference mirror is located between the SL output facet and the test object. The performance of the interferometer is investigated numerically and experimentally to determine its optimal operating conditions. We have verified the operating conditions where the behavior of the SL output power profile could indicate accurately the displacement magnitude and direction of the moving test object. The profile behavior is robust against variations in optical feedback and scale of the interferometer configuration.

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20779110
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Applied Optics; Journal Volume: 44; Journal Issue: 34; Other Information: DOI: 10.1364/AO.44.007287; (c) 2005 Optical Society of America; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; FEEDBACK; INTERFEROMETERS; INTERFEROMETRY; LIGHT SOURCES; MIRRORS; PERFORMANCE; SEMICONDUCTOR LASERS

Citation Formats

Tarun, Alvarado, Jecong, Julius, and Saloma, Caesar. In-line interferometer for direction-sensitive displacement measurements by optical feedback detection. United States: N. p., 2005. Web. doi:10.1364/AO.44.0.
Tarun, Alvarado, Jecong, Julius, & Saloma, Caesar. In-line interferometer for direction-sensitive displacement measurements by optical feedback detection. United States. doi:10.1364/AO.44.0.
Tarun, Alvarado, Jecong, Julius, and Saloma, Caesar. Thu . "In-line interferometer for direction-sensitive displacement measurements by optical feedback detection". United States. doi:10.1364/AO.44.0.
@article{osti_20779110,
title = {In-line interferometer for direction-sensitive displacement measurements by optical feedback detection},
author = {Tarun, Alvarado and Jecong, Julius and Saloma, Caesar},
abstractNote = {We demonstrate a compact in-line interferometer for direction-sensitive displacement measurement by optical feedback detection with a semiconductor laser (SL) light source. Two reflected beams from a semitransparent reference mirror and a reflecting test object interfere in the SL medium, causing a variation in its output power. The reference mirror is located between the SL output facet and the test object. The performance of the interferometer is investigated numerically and experimentally to determine its optimal operating conditions. We have verified the operating conditions where the behavior of the SL output power profile could indicate accurately the displacement magnitude and direction of the moving test object. The profile behavior is robust against variations in optical feedback and scale of the interferometer configuration.},
doi = {10.1364/AO.44.0},
journal = {Applied Optics},
number = 34,
volume = 44,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Dec 01 00:00:00 EST 2005},
month = {Thu Dec 01 00:00:00 EST 2005}
}
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