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Title: Phase demodulation method from a single fringe pattern based on correlation with a polynomial form

Abstract

The method presented extracts the demodulated phase from only one fringe pattern. Locally, this method approaches the fringe pattern morphology with the help of a mathematical model. The degree of similarity between the mathematical model and the real fringe is estimated by minimizing a correlation function. To use an optimization process, we have chosen a polynomial form such as a mathematical model. However, the use of a polynomial form induces an identification procedure with the purpose of retrieving the demodulated phase. This method, polynomial modulated phase correlation, is tested on several examples. Its performance, in terms of speed and precision, is presented on very noised fringe patterns.

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20779109
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Applied Optics; Journal Volume: 44; Journal Issue: 34; Other Information: DOI: 10.1364/AO.44.007261; (c) 2005 Optical Society of America; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; CORRELATION FUNCTIONS; IMAGE PROCESSING; MATHEMATICAL MODELS; MORPHOLOGY; OPTIMIZATION; PERFORMANCE; POLYNOMIALS

Citation Formats

Robin, Eric, Valle, Valery, and Bremand, Fabrice. Phase demodulation method from a single fringe pattern based on correlation with a polynomial form. United States: N. p., 2005. Web. doi:10.1364/AO.44.0.
Robin, Eric, Valle, Valery, & Bremand, Fabrice. Phase demodulation method from a single fringe pattern based on correlation with a polynomial form. United States. doi:10.1364/AO.44.0.
Robin, Eric, Valle, Valery, and Bremand, Fabrice. Thu . "Phase demodulation method from a single fringe pattern based on correlation with a polynomial form". United States. doi:10.1364/AO.44.0.
@article{osti_20779109,
title = {Phase demodulation method from a single fringe pattern based on correlation with a polynomial form},
author = {Robin, Eric and Valle, Valery and Bremand, Fabrice},
abstractNote = {The method presented extracts the demodulated phase from only one fringe pattern. Locally, this method approaches the fringe pattern morphology with the help of a mathematical model. The degree of similarity between the mathematical model and the real fringe is estimated by minimizing a correlation function. To use an optimization process, we have chosen a polynomial form such as a mathematical model. However, the use of a polynomial form induces an identification procedure with the purpose of retrieving the demodulated phase. This method, polynomial modulated phase correlation, is tested on several examples. Its performance, in terms of speed and precision, is presented on very noised fringe patterns.},
doi = {10.1364/AO.44.0},
journal = {Applied Optics},
number = 34,
volume = 44,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Dec 01 00:00:00 EST 2005},
month = {Thu Dec 01 00:00:00 EST 2005}
}
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