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Title: High sensitivity cymbal-based accelerometer

Abstract

A high sensitivity piezoelectric accelerometer has been developed by replacing the conventional piezoelectric rings with a cymbal transducer. The sensitivity of the cymbal-based accelerometers containing cymbal transducers with different endcap thicknesses and different seismic masses has been measured as a function of driving frequency. Due to the high d{sub 33}{sup '} coefficient of the cymbal transducers, the cymbal-based accelerometers have a high sensitivity of {approx}97 pC/ms{sup -2} with the amplitude rise of 2.85% (<1 dB) at one-third of the mounted resonance frequency (3.38 kHz). The effect of the seismic mass, the resonance frequency, and d{sub 33}{sup '} coefficient of the cymbal transducers on the sensitivity and the frequency range of the cymbal-based accelerometers are reported.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ;  [1];  [2];  [2];  [2];  [3];  [4];  [3]
  1. Department of Applied Physics, Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hunghom, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China)
  2. (China)
  3. (China) and Materials Research Center, Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hunghom, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China)
  4. (China) and Center of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20778937
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Review of Scientific Instruments; Journal Volume: 77; Journal Issue: 3; Other Information: DOI: 10.1063/1.2185487; (c) 2006 American Institute of Physics; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
46 INSTRUMENTATION RELATED TO NUCLEAR SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY; ACCELERATION; ACCELEROMETERS; AMPLITUDES; EQUIPMENT; KHZ RANGE 01-100; MASS; PIEZOELECTRICITY; RESONANCE; RINGS; SENSITIVITY; THICKNESS; TRANSDUCERS

Citation Formats

Sun Chengliang, Lam, K.H., Choy, S.H., Chan, H.L. W., Zhao, X.-Z., Choy, C.L., Materials Research Center, Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hunghom, Kowloon, Hong Kong, Department of Physics, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072, and Center of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072, Department of Applied Physics, Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hunghom, Kowloon, Hong Kong, Department of Physics, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072, and Department of Applied Physics, Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hunghom, Kowloon, Hong Kong. High sensitivity cymbal-based accelerometer. United States: N. p., 2006. Web. doi:10.1063/1.2185487.
Sun Chengliang, Lam, K.H., Choy, S.H., Chan, H.L. W., Zhao, X.-Z., Choy, C.L., Materials Research Center, Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hunghom, Kowloon, Hong Kong, Department of Physics, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072, and Center of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072, Department of Applied Physics, Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hunghom, Kowloon, Hong Kong, Department of Physics, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072, & Department of Applied Physics, Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hunghom, Kowloon, Hong Kong. High sensitivity cymbal-based accelerometer. United States. doi:10.1063/1.2185487.
Sun Chengliang, Lam, K.H., Choy, S.H., Chan, H.L. W., Zhao, X.-Z., Choy, C.L., Materials Research Center, Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hunghom, Kowloon, Hong Kong, Department of Physics, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072, and Center of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072, Department of Applied Physics, Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hunghom, Kowloon, Hong Kong, Department of Physics, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072, and Department of Applied Physics, Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hunghom, Kowloon, Hong Kong. Wed . "High sensitivity cymbal-based accelerometer". United States. doi:10.1063/1.2185487.
@article{osti_20778937,
title = {High sensitivity cymbal-based accelerometer},
author = {Sun Chengliang and Lam, K.H. and Choy, S.H. and Chan, H.L. W. and Zhao, X.-Z. and Choy, C.L. and Materials Research Center, Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hunghom, Kowloon, Hong Kong and Department of Physics, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 and and Center of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 and Department of Applied Physics, Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hunghom, Kowloon, Hong Kong and Department of Physics, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 and Department of Applied Physics, Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hunghom, Kowloon, Hong Kong},
abstractNote = {A high sensitivity piezoelectric accelerometer has been developed by replacing the conventional piezoelectric rings with a cymbal transducer. The sensitivity of the cymbal-based accelerometers containing cymbal transducers with different endcap thicknesses and different seismic masses has been measured as a function of driving frequency. Due to the high d{sub 33}{sup '} coefficient of the cymbal transducers, the cymbal-based accelerometers have a high sensitivity of {approx}97 pC/ms{sup -2} with the amplitude rise of 2.85% (<1 dB) at one-third of the mounted resonance frequency (3.38 kHz). The effect of the seismic mass, the resonance frequency, and d{sub 33}{sup '} coefficient of the cymbal transducers on the sensitivity and the frequency range of the cymbal-based accelerometers are reported.},
doi = {10.1063/1.2185487},
journal = {Review of Scientific Instruments},
number = 3,
volume = 77,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Mar 15 00:00:00 EST 2006},
month = {Wed Mar 15 00:00:00 EST 2006}
}
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  • The application of a large-area (41 x 41 cm, 2048 x 2048 or 1024 x 1024 pixel) high-sensitivity (detective quantum efficiency > 65%) fast-readout (up to 7.5 or 30 Hz) flat-panel detector based on an amorphous silicon array system to the collection of high-energy X-ray scattering data for quantitative pair distribution function (PDF) analysis is evaluated and discussed. Data were collected over a range of exposure times (0.13 s-7 min) for benchmark PDF samples: crystalline nickel metal and amorphous silica (SiO2). The high real-space resolution of the resultant PDFs (with Q{sub max} up to {approx} 40 Angstroms{sup -1})and the highmore » quality of fits to data [RNi(0.13s) = 10.5%, RNi(1.3s) = 6.3%] obtained in short measurement times indicate that this detector is well suited to studies of materials disorder. Further applications of the detector to locate weakly scattering H2 molecules within the porous Prussian blue system, Mn{sup II}{sub 3}[CoIII(CN)6]2 x xH2, and to follow the in situ reduction of PtIVO2 to Pt0 at 30 Hz, confirm the high sensitivity of the detector and demonstrate a new potential for fast time-resolved studies.« less