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Title: Component-resolved determination of the magnetization by magnetization-induced optical second-harmonic generation

Abstract

We present a method for simultaneously measuring the two normalized in-plane magnetization components in magnetic thin films that allows for the reconstruction of the magnetization angle and the normalized value of the magnetization with subnanosecond temporal resolution. The calibrated method relies on the large contrast associated with magnetization-induced optical second-harmonic generation, permitting measurements with a dynamic range in excess of 25 dB. Calibration is achieved by the determination of the relative magnitude and phase of the essential nonlinear optical tensor components, including those of a magneto-optic origin. Ellipsometric determination of the polarization of the second-harmonic signal, when the magnetization is saturated along four in-plane Cartesian directions, is sufficient to determine the second-order nonlinear tensor components. These four directions represent the two saturated states along the longitudinal and transverse directions of the magnetization, respectively. The tensor components are subsequently used to uniquely determine the in-plane magnetization amplitude and direction.

Authors:
; ;  [1];  [2]
  1. National Institute of Standards and Technology, Boulder, Colorado 80305 (United States)
  2. (Netherlands)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20778928
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Review of Scientific Instruments; Journal Volume: 77; Journal Issue: 3; Other Information: DOI: 10.1063/1.2179414; (c) 2006 American Institute of Physics; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
75 CONDENSED MATTER PHYSICS, SUPERCONDUCTIVITY AND SUPERFLUIDITY; AMPLITUDES; CALIBRATION; HARMONIC GENERATION; MAGNETIZATION; MAGNETO-OPTICAL EFFECTS; NONLINEAR PROBLEMS; POLARIZATION; RESOLUTION; SIGNALS; TENSORS; THIN FILMS

Citation Formats

Gerrits, Th., Silva, T.J., Rasing, Th., and Institute for Molecules and Materials, Radboud University Nijmegen, Toernooiveld 1, 6525 ED Nijmegen. Component-resolved determination of the magnetization by magnetization-induced optical second-harmonic generation. United States: N. p., 2006. Web. doi:10.1063/1.2179414.
Gerrits, Th., Silva, T.J., Rasing, Th., & Institute for Molecules and Materials, Radboud University Nijmegen, Toernooiveld 1, 6525 ED Nijmegen. Component-resolved determination of the magnetization by magnetization-induced optical second-harmonic generation. United States. doi:10.1063/1.2179414.
Gerrits, Th., Silva, T.J., Rasing, Th., and Institute for Molecules and Materials, Radboud University Nijmegen, Toernooiveld 1, 6525 ED Nijmegen. Wed . "Component-resolved determination of the magnetization by magnetization-induced optical second-harmonic generation". United States. doi:10.1063/1.2179414.
@article{osti_20778928,
title = {Component-resolved determination of the magnetization by magnetization-induced optical second-harmonic generation},
author = {Gerrits, Th. and Silva, T.J. and Rasing, Th. and Institute for Molecules and Materials, Radboud University Nijmegen, Toernooiveld 1, 6525 ED Nijmegen},
abstractNote = {We present a method for simultaneously measuring the two normalized in-plane magnetization components in magnetic thin films that allows for the reconstruction of the magnetization angle and the normalized value of the magnetization with subnanosecond temporal resolution. The calibrated method relies on the large contrast associated with magnetization-induced optical second-harmonic generation, permitting measurements with a dynamic range in excess of 25 dB. Calibration is achieved by the determination of the relative magnitude and phase of the essential nonlinear optical tensor components, including those of a magneto-optic origin. Ellipsometric determination of the polarization of the second-harmonic signal, when the magnetization is saturated along four in-plane Cartesian directions, is sufficient to determine the second-order nonlinear tensor components. These four directions represent the two saturated states along the longitudinal and transverse directions of the magnetization, respectively. The tensor components are subsequently used to uniquely determine the in-plane magnetization amplitude and direction.},
doi = {10.1063/1.2179414},
journal = {Review of Scientific Instruments},
number = 3,
volume = 77,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Mar 15 00:00:00 EST 2006},
month = {Wed Mar 15 00:00:00 EST 2006}
}
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