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Title: Detection of pico-Tesla magnetic fields using magneto-electric sensors at room temperature

Abstract

The measurement of low-frequency (10{sup -2}-10{sup 3} Hz) minute magnetic field variations (10{sup -12} Tesla) at room temperature in a passive mode of operation would be critically enabling for deployable neurological signal interfacing and magnetic anomaly detection applications. However, there is presently no magnetic field sensor capable of meeting all of these requirements. Here, we present new bimorph and push-pull magneto-electric laminate composites, which incorporate a charge compensation mechanism (or bridge) that dramatically enhances noise rejection, enabling achievement of such requirements.

Authors:
; ; ; ;  [1]
  1. Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, Virginia 24061 (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20778680
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Applied Physics Letters; Journal Volume: 88; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: DOI: 10.1063/1.2172706; (c) 2006 American Institute of Physics; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; DETECTION; HZ RANGE; MAGNETIC FIELDS; MEASURING METHODS; TEMPERATURE RANGE 0273-0400 K

Citation Formats

Zhai Junyi, Xing Zengping, Dong Shuxiang, Li Jiefang, and Viehland, D. Detection of pico-Tesla magnetic fields using magneto-electric sensors at room temperature. United States: N. p., 2006. Web. doi:10.1063/1.2172706.
Zhai Junyi, Xing Zengping, Dong Shuxiang, Li Jiefang, & Viehland, D. Detection of pico-Tesla magnetic fields using magneto-electric sensors at room temperature. United States. doi:10.1063/1.2172706.
Zhai Junyi, Xing Zengping, Dong Shuxiang, Li Jiefang, and Viehland, D. Mon . "Detection of pico-Tesla magnetic fields using magneto-electric sensors at room temperature". United States. doi:10.1063/1.2172706.
@article{osti_20778680,
title = {Detection of pico-Tesla magnetic fields using magneto-electric sensors at room temperature},
author = {Zhai Junyi and Xing Zengping and Dong Shuxiang and Li Jiefang and Viehland, D.},
abstractNote = {The measurement of low-frequency (10{sup -2}-10{sup 3} Hz) minute magnetic field variations (10{sup -12} Tesla) at room temperature in a passive mode of operation would be critically enabling for deployable neurological signal interfacing and magnetic anomaly detection applications. However, there is presently no magnetic field sensor capable of meeting all of these requirements. Here, we present new bimorph and push-pull magneto-electric laminate composites, which incorporate a charge compensation mechanism (or bridge) that dramatically enhances noise rejection, enabling achievement of such requirements.},
doi = {10.1063/1.2172706},
journal = {Applied Physics Letters},
number = 6,
volume = 88,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Feb 06 00:00:00 EST 2006},
month = {Mon Feb 06 00:00:00 EST 2006}
}
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