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Title: System for detecting acoustic emissions in multianvil experiments: Application to deep seismicity in the Earth

Abstract

One of the major goals in the experimental study of deep earthquakes is to identify slip instabilities at high pressure and high temperature (HPHT) that might be responsible for the occurrence of earthquakes. Detecting acoustic emissions from a specimen during faulting provides unique constraints on the instability process. There are few experimental studies reporting acoustic emissions under HPHT conditions, due to technical challenges. And those studies have used only one or at most two acoustic sensors during the experiments. Such techniques preclude the accurate location of the acoustic emission source region and thus the ability to distinguish real signal from noise that may be coming from outside the sample. We have developed a system for detecting acoustic emissions at HPHT. Here we present a four-channel acoustic emission detecting system working in the HPHT octahedral multianvil apparatus. Each channel has high resolution (12 bits) and a sampling rate of 30 MHz. In experiments at the pressures up to 6 GPa and temperatures up to 770 deg. C, we have observed acoustic emissions under various conditions. Analyzing these signals, we are able to show that this system permits us to distinguish between signal and noise, locate the source of the acoustic emission,more » and obtain reliable data on the radiation pattern. This system has greatly improved our ability to study faulting instabilities under high pressure and high temperature.« less

Authors:
; ; ;  [1];  [2];  [3];  [3];  [3]
  1. Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics, University of California, Riverside, California 92521 (United States)
  2. (United States) and Department of Terrestrial Magnetism, Carnegie Institute of Washington, Washington, DC 20015 (United States)
  3. (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20778563
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Review of Scientific Instruments; Journal Volume: 77; Journal Issue: 1; Other Information: DOI: 10.1063/1.2148994; (c) 2006 American Institute of Physics; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
58 GEOSCIENCES; EARTHQUAKES; EQUIPMENT; MHZ RANGE 01-100; PRESSURE RANGE GIGA PA; RESOLUTION; SEISMIC DETECTION; SEISMICITY; SIGNALS; SLIP; TEMPERATURE RANGE 0400-1000 K

Citation Formats

Jung, Haemyeong, Fei Yingwei, Silver, Paul G., Green, Harry W., Geophysical Laboratory, Carnegie Institute of Washington, Washington, DC 20015, Geophysical Laboratory, Carnegie Institute of Washington, Washington, DC 20015, Department of Terrestrial Magnetism, Carnegie Institute of Washington, Washington, DC 20015, and Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics, University of California, Riverside, California 92521 and Department of Earth Sciences, University of California, Riverside, California 92521. System for detecting acoustic emissions in multianvil experiments: Application to deep seismicity in the Earth. United States: N. p., 2006. Web. doi:10.1063/1.2148994.
Jung, Haemyeong, Fei Yingwei, Silver, Paul G., Green, Harry W., Geophysical Laboratory, Carnegie Institute of Washington, Washington, DC 20015, Geophysical Laboratory, Carnegie Institute of Washington, Washington, DC 20015, Department of Terrestrial Magnetism, Carnegie Institute of Washington, Washington, DC 20015, & Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics, University of California, Riverside, California 92521 and Department of Earth Sciences, University of California, Riverside, California 92521. System for detecting acoustic emissions in multianvil experiments: Application to deep seismicity in the Earth. United States. doi:10.1063/1.2148994.
Jung, Haemyeong, Fei Yingwei, Silver, Paul G., Green, Harry W., Geophysical Laboratory, Carnegie Institute of Washington, Washington, DC 20015, Geophysical Laboratory, Carnegie Institute of Washington, Washington, DC 20015, Department of Terrestrial Magnetism, Carnegie Institute of Washington, Washington, DC 20015, and Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics, University of California, Riverside, California 92521 and Department of Earth Sciences, University of California, Riverside, California 92521. Sun . "System for detecting acoustic emissions in multianvil experiments: Application to deep seismicity in the Earth". United States. doi:10.1063/1.2148994.
@article{osti_20778563,
title = {System for detecting acoustic emissions in multianvil experiments: Application to deep seismicity in the Earth},
author = {Jung, Haemyeong and Fei Yingwei and Silver, Paul G. and Green, Harry W. and Geophysical Laboratory, Carnegie Institute of Washington, Washington, DC 20015 and Geophysical Laboratory, Carnegie Institute of Washington, Washington, DC 20015 and Department of Terrestrial Magnetism, Carnegie Institute of Washington, Washington, DC 20015 and Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics, University of California, Riverside, California 92521 and Department of Earth Sciences, University of California, Riverside, California 92521},
abstractNote = {One of the major goals in the experimental study of deep earthquakes is to identify slip instabilities at high pressure and high temperature (HPHT) that might be responsible for the occurrence of earthquakes. Detecting acoustic emissions from a specimen during faulting provides unique constraints on the instability process. There are few experimental studies reporting acoustic emissions under HPHT conditions, due to technical challenges. And those studies have used only one or at most two acoustic sensors during the experiments. Such techniques preclude the accurate location of the acoustic emission source region and thus the ability to distinguish real signal from noise that may be coming from outside the sample. We have developed a system for detecting acoustic emissions at HPHT. Here we present a four-channel acoustic emission detecting system working in the HPHT octahedral multianvil apparatus. Each channel has high resolution (12 bits) and a sampling rate of 30 MHz. In experiments at the pressures up to 6 GPa and temperatures up to 770 deg. C, we have observed acoustic emissions under various conditions. Analyzing these signals, we are able to show that this system permits us to distinguish between signal and noise, locate the source of the acoustic emission, and obtain reliable data on the radiation pattern. This system has greatly improved our ability to study faulting instabilities under high pressure and high temperature.},
doi = {10.1063/1.2148994},
journal = {Review of Scientific Instruments},
number = 1,
volume = 77,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Jan 15 00:00:00 EST 2006},
month = {Sun Jan 15 00:00:00 EST 2006}
}
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