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Title: Holographically generated twisted nematic liquid crystal gratings

Abstract

A reflection holographic method is introduced to fabricate an electro-optically tunable twisted nematic (TN) liquid crystal (LC) grating, forgoing the geometrical drawing. The photoisomerization process occurring on the LC alignment layers of an LC cell in the reflection holographic configuration gives a control over the twist angle, and the grating spacing is determined by the slant angle of reflection holographic configuration. The resulting diffraction grating is in a structure of a reverse TN LC, permitting a polarization-independent diffraction efficiency. The electro-optic tunability of the diffraction efficiency is also demonstrated.

Authors:
; ; ;  [1];  [2];  [3]
  1. Department of Physics, Ewha Womans University, Seoul 120-750 (Korea, Republic of)
  2. (United States)
  3. (Korea, Republic of)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20778507
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Applied Physics Letters; Journal Volume: 88; Journal Issue: 2; Other Information: DOI: 10.1063/1.2162672; (c) 2006 American Institute of Physics; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; ALIGNMENT; DIFFRACTION; DIFFRACTION GRATINGS; ELECTRO-OPTICAL EFFECTS; LAYERS; LIQUID CRYSTALS; PHOTOCHEMISTRY; POLARIZATION; REFLECTION

Citation Formats

Choi, Hyunhee, Wu, J.W., Chang, Hye Jeong, Park, Byoungchoo, Institute of Optics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14627, and Department of Electrophysics, Kwangwoon University, Seoul 139-701. Holographically generated twisted nematic liquid crystal gratings. United States: N. p., 2006. Web. doi:10.1063/1.2162672.
Choi, Hyunhee, Wu, J.W., Chang, Hye Jeong, Park, Byoungchoo, Institute of Optics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14627, & Department of Electrophysics, Kwangwoon University, Seoul 139-701. Holographically generated twisted nematic liquid crystal gratings. United States. doi:10.1063/1.2162672.
Choi, Hyunhee, Wu, J.W., Chang, Hye Jeong, Park, Byoungchoo, Institute of Optics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14627, and Department of Electrophysics, Kwangwoon University, Seoul 139-701. Mon . "Holographically generated twisted nematic liquid crystal gratings". United States. doi:10.1063/1.2162672.
@article{osti_20778507,
title = {Holographically generated twisted nematic liquid crystal gratings},
author = {Choi, Hyunhee and Wu, J.W. and Chang, Hye Jeong and Park, Byoungchoo and Institute of Optics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14627 and Department of Electrophysics, Kwangwoon University, Seoul 139-701},
abstractNote = {A reflection holographic method is introduced to fabricate an electro-optically tunable twisted nematic (TN) liquid crystal (LC) grating, forgoing the geometrical drawing. The photoisomerization process occurring on the LC alignment layers of an LC cell in the reflection holographic configuration gives a control over the twist angle, and the grating spacing is determined by the slant angle of reflection holographic configuration. The resulting diffraction grating is in a structure of a reverse TN LC, permitting a polarization-independent diffraction efficiency. The electro-optic tunability of the diffraction efficiency is also demonstrated.},
doi = {10.1063/1.2162672},
journal = {Applied Physics Letters},
number = 2,
volume = 88,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jan 09 00:00:00 EST 2006},
month = {Mon Jan 09 00:00:00 EST 2006}
}
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  • No abstract prepared.