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Title: Discrete model for laser driven etching and microstructuring of metallic surfaces

Abstract

We present a unidimensional discrete solid-on-solid model evolving in time using a kinetic Monte Carlo method to simulate microstructuring of kerfs on metallic surfaces by means of laser-induced jet-chemical etching. The precise control of the passivation layer achieved by this technique is responsible for the high resolution of the structures. However, within a certain range of experimental parameters, the microstructuring of kerfs on stainless steel surfaces with a solution of H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} shows periodic ripples, which are considered to originate from intrinsic dynamics. The model mimics a few of the various physical and chemical processes involved and within certain parameter ranges reproduces some morphological aspects of the structures, in particular ripple regimes. We analyze the range of values of laser beam power for the appearance of ripples in both experimental and simulated kerfs. The discrete model is an extension of one that has been used previously in the context of ion sputtering and is related to a noisy version of the Kuramoto-Sivashinsky equation used extensively in the field of pattern formation.

Authors:
; ; ;  [1];  [2]
  1. Institut fuer Hoechstleistungsrechnen (IHR), University of Stuttgart, Nobelstrasse 19, D-70569 Stuttgart (Germany)
  2. (Germany)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20778461
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Physical Review. E, Statistical Physics, Plasmas, Fluids, and Related Interdisciplinary Topics; Journal Volume: 72; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevE.72.061604; (c) 2005 The American Physical Society; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; ETCHING; LASERS; LAYERS; MONTE CARLO METHOD; PASSIVATION; PERIODICITY; PHOSPHORIC ACID; SIMULATION; SOLUTIONS; SPUTTERING; STAINLESS STEELS

Citation Formats

Mora, Alejandro, Haase, Maria, Rabbow, Thomas, Plath, Peter Joerg, and Institut fuer Angewandte und Physikalische Chemie, Chemische Synergetik, University of Bremen, Bibliotheksstrasse NW2, D-28359 Bremen. Discrete model for laser driven etching and microstructuring of metallic surfaces. United States: N. p., 2005. Web. doi:10.1103/PHYSREVE.72.0.
Mora, Alejandro, Haase, Maria, Rabbow, Thomas, Plath, Peter Joerg, & Institut fuer Angewandte und Physikalische Chemie, Chemische Synergetik, University of Bremen, Bibliotheksstrasse NW2, D-28359 Bremen. Discrete model for laser driven etching and microstructuring of metallic surfaces. United States. doi:10.1103/PHYSREVE.72.0.
Mora, Alejandro, Haase, Maria, Rabbow, Thomas, Plath, Peter Joerg, and Institut fuer Angewandte und Physikalische Chemie, Chemische Synergetik, University of Bremen, Bibliotheksstrasse NW2, D-28359 Bremen. Thu . "Discrete model for laser driven etching and microstructuring of metallic surfaces". United States. doi:10.1103/PHYSREVE.72.0.
@article{osti_20778461,
title = {Discrete model for laser driven etching and microstructuring of metallic surfaces},
author = {Mora, Alejandro and Haase, Maria and Rabbow, Thomas and Plath, Peter Joerg and Institut fuer Angewandte und Physikalische Chemie, Chemische Synergetik, University of Bremen, Bibliotheksstrasse NW2, D-28359 Bremen},
abstractNote = {We present a unidimensional discrete solid-on-solid model evolving in time using a kinetic Monte Carlo method to simulate microstructuring of kerfs on metallic surfaces by means of laser-induced jet-chemical etching. The precise control of the passivation layer achieved by this technique is responsible for the high resolution of the structures. However, within a certain range of experimental parameters, the microstructuring of kerfs on stainless steel surfaces with a solution of H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} shows periodic ripples, which are considered to originate from intrinsic dynamics. The model mimics a few of the various physical and chemical processes involved and within certain parameter ranges reproduces some morphological aspects of the structures, in particular ripple regimes. We analyze the range of values of laser beam power for the appearance of ripples in both experimental and simulated kerfs. The discrete model is an extension of one that has been used previously in the context of ion sputtering and is related to a noisy version of the Kuramoto-Sivashinsky equation used extensively in the field of pattern formation.},
doi = {10.1103/PHYSREVE.72.0},
journal = {Physical Review. E, Statistical Physics, Plasmas, Fluids, and Related Interdisciplinary Topics},
number = 6,
volume = 72,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Dec 15 00:00:00 EST 2005},
month = {Thu Dec 15 00:00:00 EST 2005}
}
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