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Title: Universality in Solar Flare and Earthquake Occurrence

Abstract

Earthquakes and solar flares are phenomena involving huge and rapid releases of energy characterized by complex temporal occurrence. By analyzing available experimental catalogs, we show that the stochastic processes underlying these apparently different phenomena have universal properties. Namely, both problems exhibit the same distributions of sizes, interoccurrence times, and the same temporal clustering: We find after flare sequences with power law temporal correlations as the Omori law for seismic sequences. The observed universality suggests a common approach to the interpretation of both phenomena in terms of the same driving physical mechanism.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3];  [4]
  1. Department of Information Engineering and CNISM, Second University of Naples, 81031 Aversa (CE) (Italy)
  2. Department of Environmental Sciences and CNISM, Second University of Naples, 81100 Caserta (Italy)
  3. University of Naples 'Federico II', 80125 Naples (Italy)
  4. Department of Physical Sciences, University of Naples 'Federico II', Coherentia-CNR and INFN, 80125 Naples (Italy)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20777015
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Physical Review Letters; Journal Volume: 96; Journal Issue: 5; Other Information: DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevLett.96.051102; (c) 2006 The American Physical Society; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; 36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; COMPARATIVE EVALUATIONS; CORRELATION FUNCTIONS; EARTHQUAKES; SOLAR FLARES; STOCHASTIC PROCESSES

Citation Formats

De Arcangelis, L., Godano, C., Lippiello, E., and Nicodemi, M.. Universality in Solar Flare and Earthquake Occurrence. United States: N. p., 2006. Web. doi:10.1103/PhysRevLett.96.051102.
De Arcangelis, L., Godano, C., Lippiello, E., & Nicodemi, M.. Universality in Solar Flare and Earthquake Occurrence. United States. doi:10.1103/PhysRevLett.96.051102.
De Arcangelis, L., Godano, C., Lippiello, E., and Nicodemi, M.. 2006. "Universality in Solar Flare and Earthquake Occurrence". United States. doi:10.1103/PhysRevLett.96.051102.
@article{osti_20777015,
title = {Universality in Solar Flare and Earthquake Occurrence},
author = {De Arcangelis, L. and Godano, C. and Lippiello, E. and Nicodemi, M.},
abstractNote = {Earthquakes and solar flares are phenomena involving huge and rapid releases of energy characterized by complex temporal occurrence. By analyzing available experimental catalogs, we show that the stochastic processes underlying these apparently different phenomena have universal properties. Namely, both problems exhibit the same distributions of sizes, interoccurrence times, and the same temporal clustering: We find after flare sequences with power law temporal correlations as the Omori law for seismic sequences. The observed universality suggests a common approach to the interpretation of both phenomena in terms of the same driving physical mechanism.},
doi = {10.1103/PhysRevLett.96.051102},
journal = {Physical Review Letters},
number = 5,
volume = 96,
place = {United States},
year = 2006,
month = 2
}
  • The occurrence rate of major flares during solar cycle 19 has been analyzed. A periodicity of 51 d is found, which is one-third of the period found from the flare rates of solar cycles 20 and 21 by various authors. The statistical significance of the periodicity is estimated to be at 99.85-percent confidence level. This periodicity is though to be related to the 153-d periodicity. The template of the phase diagram is well described by a constant plus a sine function. Additionally, an 18-month periodicity is found in the flare rate of the northern hemisphere. 17 references.
  • Recent numerical results for a model describing dispersive transport in ricepiles are explained by mapping the model to the depinning transition of an elastic interface that is dragged at one end through a random medium. The average velocity of transport vanishes with system size {ital L} as {l_angle}{ital v}{r_angle}{approximately}{ital L}{sup 2{minus}{ital D}}{approximately}{ital L}{sup {minus}0.23}, and the avalanche size distribution exponent {tau}=2{minus}1/{ital D}{approx_equal}1.55, where {ital D}{approx_equal}2.23 from interface depinning. We conjecture that the purely deterministic Burridge-Knopoff {open_quote}{open_quote}train{close_quote}{close_quote} model for earthquakes is in the same universality class. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}
  • We propose that an appropriate prototype for modeling self-organized criticality in dissipative systems is a generalized version of the two-variable cellular automata model introduced by Hergarten and Neugebauer [Phys. Rev. E 61, 2382 (2000)]. We show that the model predicts exponents for the event size distribution which are consistent with physically observed results for dissipative phenomena such as earthquakes. In addition we provide evidence that the model is critical based on both scaling analyses and direct observation of the distribution and behavior of the two variables in the interior of the lattice. We further argue that for reasonably large latticesmore » the results are universal for all dissipative choices of the model parameters.« less
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