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Title: Systematic Study of the {sup 87}Sr Clock Transition in an Optical Lattice

Abstract

With ultracold {sup 87}Sr confined in a magic wavelength optical lattice, we present the most precise study (2.8 Hz statistical uncertainty) to date of the {sup 1}S{sub 0}-{sup 3}P{sub 0} optical clock transition with a detailed analysis of systematic shifts (19 Hz uncertainty) in the absolute frequency measurement of 429 228 004 229 869 Hz. The high resolution permits an investigation of the optical lattice motional sideband structure. The local oscillator for this optical atomic clock is a stable diode laser with its hertz-level linewidth characterized by an octave-spanning femtosecond frequency comb.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ;  [1]
  1. JILA and Department of Physics, National Institute of Standards and Technology and University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309-0440 (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20776982
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Physical Review Letters; Journal Volume: 96; Journal Issue: 3; Other Information: DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevLett.96.033003; (c) 2006 The American Physical Society; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; ATOMIC CLOCKS; COOLING; FREQUENCY MEASUREMENT; LASERS; OSCILLATORS; PHOTON-ATOM COLLISIONS; RESOLUTION; SPECTRAL SHIFT; STRONTIUM 87; WAVELENGTHS

Citation Formats

Ludlow, Andrew D., Boyd, Martin M., Zelevinsky, Tanya, Foreman, Seth M., Blatt, Sebastian, Notcutt, Mark, Ido, Tetsuya, and Ye Jun. Systematic Study of the {sup 87}Sr Clock Transition in an Optical Lattice. United States: N. p., 2006. Web. doi:10.1103/PhysRevLett.96.033003.
Ludlow, Andrew D., Boyd, Martin M., Zelevinsky, Tanya, Foreman, Seth M., Blatt, Sebastian, Notcutt, Mark, Ido, Tetsuya, & Ye Jun. Systematic Study of the {sup 87}Sr Clock Transition in an Optical Lattice. United States. doi:10.1103/PhysRevLett.96.033003.
Ludlow, Andrew D., Boyd, Martin M., Zelevinsky, Tanya, Foreman, Seth M., Blatt, Sebastian, Notcutt, Mark, Ido, Tetsuya, and Ye Jun. Fri . "Systematic Study of the {sup 87}Sr Clock Transition in an Optical Lattice". United States. doi:10.1103/PhysRevLett.96.033003.
@article{osti_20776982,
title = {Systematic Study of the {sup 87}Sr Clock Transition in an Optical Lattice},
author = {Ludlow, Andrew D. and Boyd, Martin M. and Zelevinsky, Tanya and Foreman, Seth M. and Blatt, Sebastian and Notcutt, Mark and Ido, Tetsuya and Ye Jun},
abstractNote = {With ultracold {sup 87}Sr confined in a magic wavelength optical lattice, we present the most precise study (2.8 Hz statistical uncertainty) to date of the {sup 1}S{sub 0}-{sup 3}P{sub 0} optical clock transition with a detailed analysis of systematic shifts (19 Hz uncertainty) in the absolute frequency measurement of 429 228 004 229 869 Hz. The high resolution permits an investigation of the optical lattice motional sideband structure. The local oscillator for this optical atomic clock is a stable diode laser with its hertz-level linewidth characterized by an octave-spanning femtosecond frequency comb.},
doi = {10.1103/PhysRevLett.96.033003},
journal = {Physical Review Letters},
number = 3,
volume = 96,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Jan 27 00:00:00 EST 2006},
month = {Fri Jan 27 00:00:00 EST 2006}
}
  • We report a frequency measurement of the {sup 1}S{sub 0}-{sup 3}P{sub 0} transition of {sup 87}Sr atoms in an optical lattice clock. The frequency is determined to be 429 228 004 229 879(5) Hz with a fractional uncertainty that is comparable to state-of-the-art optical clocks with neutral atoms in free fall. The two previous measurements of this transition were found to disagree by about 2x10{sup -13}, i.e., almost 4 times the combined error bar and 4 to 5 orders of magnitude larger than the claimed ultimate accuracy of this new type of clocks. Our measurement is in agreement with onemore » of these two values and essentially resolves this discrepancy.« less
  • We observe two-body loss of {sup 3} P{sub 0} {sup 87}Sr atoms trapped in a one-dimensional optical lattice. We measure loss rate coefficients for atomic samples between 1 and 6 {mu}K that are prepared either in a single nuclear-spin sublevel or with equal populations in two sublevels. The measured temperature and nuclear-spin preparation dependence of rate coefficients agree well with calculations and reveal that rate coefficients for distinguishable atoms are only slightly enhanced over those of indistinguishable atoms. We further observe a suppression of excitation and losses during interrogation of the {sup 1} S{sub 0}-{sup 3} P{sub 0} transition asmore » density increases and Rabi frequency decreases, which suggests the presence of strong interactions in our dynamically driven many-body system.« less
  • Aided by ultrahigh resolution spectroscopy, the overall systematic uncertainty of the {sup 1}S{sub 0}-{sup 3}P{sub 0} clock resonance for lattice-confined {sup 87}Sr has been characterized to 9x10{sup -16}. This uncertainty is at a level similar to the Cs-fountain primary standard, while the potential stability for the lattice clocks exceeds that of Cs. The absolute frequency of the clock transition has been measured to be 429 228 004 229 874.0(1.1) Hz, where the 2.5x10{sup -15} fractional uncertainty represents the most accurate measurement of a neutral-atom-based optical transition frequency to date.
  • We report calculations assessing the ultimate precision of an atomic clock based on the 578 nm 6 {sup 1}S{sub 0}{yields}6 {sup 3}P{sub 0} transition in Yb atoms confined in an optical lattice trap. We find that this transition has a natural linewidth less than 10 mHz in the odd Yb isotopes, caused by hyperfine coupling. The shift in this transition due to the trapping light acting through the lowest order ac polarizability is found to become zero at the magic trap wavelength of about 752 nm. The effects of Rayleigh scattering, multipole polarizabilities, vector polarizability, and hyperfine induced electronic magneticmore » moments can all be held below 1 mHz (about one part in 10{sup 18}). In the case of the hyperpolarizability, however, larger shifts due to nearly resonant terms cannot be ruled out without an accurate measurement of the magic wavelength.« less
  • We present detailed analyses of our recent experiment on the three-dimensional (3D) optical lattice clock with bosonic {sup 88}Sr atoms in which the collisional frequency shift was suppressed by applying a single-occupancy lattice. Frequency shifts in magnetically induced spectroscopy on the {sup 1}S{sub 0}-{sup 3}P{sub 0} clock transition ({lambda}=698 nm) of {sup 88}Sr were experimentally investigated by referencing a one-dimensional (1D) lattice clock based on spin-polarized {sup 87}Sr atoms. We discuss that the clock stability is limited by the current laser stability as well as the experimental sequence of the clock operation, which may be improved to {sigma}{sub y}({tau})=2x10{sup -16}/{radical}({tau})more » by optimizing the cycle time of the clock operation.« less