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Title: Physics and optimization of beta beams: From low to very high gamma

Abstract

The physics potential of beta beams is investigated from low to very high gamma values and it is compared to superbeams and neutrino factories. The gamma factor and the baseline are treated as continuous variables in the optimization of the beta beam, while a fixed mass water Cherenkov detector or a totally active scintillator detector is assumed. We include in our discussion also the gamma dependence of the number of ion decays per year. For low gamma, we find that a beta beam could be a very interesting alternative to a superbeam upgrade, especially if it is operated at the second oscillation maximum to reduce correlations and degeneracies. For high gamma, we find that a beta beam could have a potential similar to a neutrino factory. In all cases, the sensitivity of the beta beams to CP violation is very impressive if similar neutrino and antineutrino event rates can be achieved.

Authors:
 [1]; ;  [2];  [3]
  1. Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, 1150 University Avenue, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States)
  2. Physik-Department, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, James-Franck-Strasse, 85748 Garching (Germany)
  3. School of Natural Sciences, Institute for Advanced Study, Einstein Drive, Princeton, New Jersey 08540 (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20776837
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Physical Review. D, Particles Fields; Journal Volume: 73; Journal Issue: 5; Other Information: DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevD.73.053002; (c) 2006 The American Physical Society; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
72 PHYSICS OF ELEMENTARY PARTICLES AND FIELDS; ANTINEUTRINOS; CHERENKOV COUNTERS; CORRELATIONS; CP INVARIANCE; DECAY; MASS; NEUTRINO OSCILLATION; OPTIMIZATION; SCINTILLATION COUNTERS; SENSITIVITY; WATER

Citation Formats

Huber, Patrick, Lindner, Manfred, Rolinec, Mark, and Winter, Walter. Physics and optimization of beta beams: From low to very high gamma. United States: N. p., 2006. Web. doi:10.1103/PhysRevD.73.053002.
Huber, Patrick, Lindner, Manfred, Rolinec, Mark, & Winter, Walter. Physics and optimization of beta beams: From low to very high gamma. United States. doi:10.1103/PhysRevD.73.053002.
Huber, Patrick, Lindner, Manfred, Rolinec, Mark, and Winter, Walter. Wed . "Physics and optimization of beta beams: From low to very high gamma". United States. doi:10.1103/PhysRevD.73.053002.
@article{osti_20776837,
title = {Physics and optimization of beta beams: From low to very high gamma},
author = {Huber, Patrick and Lindner, Manfred and Rolinec, Mark and Winter, Walter},
abstractNote = {The physics potential of beta beams is investigated from low to very high gamma values and it is compared to superbeams and neutrino factories. The gamma factor and the baseline are treated as continuous variables in the optimization of the beta beam, while a fixed mass water Cherenkov detector or a totally active scintillator detector is assumed. We include in our discussion also the gamma dependence of the number of ion decays per year. For low gamma, we find that a beta beam could be a very interesting alternative to a superbeam upgrade, especially if it is operated at the second oscillation maximum to reduce correlations and degeneracies. For high gamma, we find that a beta beam could have a potential similar to a neutrino factory. In all cases, the sensitivity of the beta beams to CP violation is very impressive if similar neutrino and antineutrino event rates can be achieved.},
doi = {10.1103/PhysRevD.73.053002},
journal = {Physical Review. D, Particles Fields},
number = 5,
volume = 73,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Mar 01 00:00:00 EST 2006},
month = {Wed Mar 01 00:00:00 EST 2006}
}
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