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Title: {sup 52}Cr Spinor Condensate: A Biaxial or Uniaxial Spin Nematic

Abstract

We show that the newly discovered {sup 52}Cr Bose condensate in zero magnetic field can be a spin nematic of the following kind: a 'maximum' polar state, a 'colinear' polar state, or a biaxial nematic ferromagnetic state. We also present the phase diagram with a magnetic field in the interaction subspace containing the chromium condensate. It contains many uniaxial and biaxial spin nematic phases, which often but not always break time reversal symmetry, and can exist with or without spontaneous magnetization.

Authors:
;  [1]
  1. Department of Physics, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20775242
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Physical Review Letters; Journal Volume: 96; Journal Issue: 19; Other Information: DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevLett.96.190405; (c) 2006 The American Physical Society; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; BOSE-EINSTEIN CONDENSATION; CHROMIUM 52; MAGNETIC FIELDS; MAGNETIZATION; PHASE DIAGRAMS; SPIN; SYMMETRY

Citation Formats

Diener, Roberto B., and Ho, T.-L. {sup 52}Cr Spinor Condensate: A Biaxial or Uniaxial Spin Nematic. United States: N. p., 2006. Web. doi:10.1103/PhysRevLett.96.190405.
Diener, Roberto B., & Ho, T.-L. {sup 52}Cr Spinor Condensate: A Biaxial or Uniaxial Spin Nematic. United States. doi:10.1103/PhysRevLett.96.190405.
Diener, Roberto B., and Ho, T.-L. 2006. "{sup 52}Cr Spinor Condensate: A Biaxial or Uniaxial Spin Nematic". United States. doi:10.1103/PhysRevLett.96.190405.
@article{osti_20775242,
title = {{sup 52}Cr Spinor Condensate: A Biaxial or Uniaxial Spin Nematic},
author = {Diener, Roberto B. and Ho, T.-L.},
abstractNote = {We show that the newly discovered {sup 52}Cr Bose condensate in zero magnetic field can be a spin nematic of the following kind: a 'maximum' polar state, a 'colinear' polar state, or a biaxial nematic ferromagnetic state. We also present the phase diagram with a magnetic field in the interaction subspace containing the chromium condensate. It contains many uniaxial and biaxial spin nematic phases, which often but not always break time reversal symmetry, and can exist with or without spontaneous magnetization.},
doi = {10.1103/PhysRevLett.96.190405},
journal = {Physical Review Letters},
number = 19,
volume = 96,
place = {United States},
year = 2006,
month = 5
}
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