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Title: A Theory of Electromagnetic Fluctuations for Metallic Surfaces and van der Waals Interactions between Metallic Bodies

Abstract

A new general expression is derived for the fluctuating electromagnetic field outside a metal surface in terms of its surface impedance. It provides a generalization to real metals of Lifshitz theory of molecular interactions between dielectric solids. The theory is used to compute the radiative heat transfer between two parallel metal surfaces at different temperatures. It is shown that a measurement of this quantity may provide an experimental resolution of a long-standing controversy about the effect of thermal corrections on the Casimir force between real metal plates.

Authors:
 [1];  [2]
  1. Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche, Universita di Napoli Federico II, Complesso Universitario MSA, Via Cintia I-80126 Naples (Italy)
  2. (Italy)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20775178
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Physical Review Letters; Journal Volume: 96; Journal Issue: 16; Other Information: DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevLett.96.160401; (c) 2006 The American Physical Society; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; CASIMIR EFFECT; DIELECTRIC MATERIALS; ELECTROMAGNETIC FIELDS; FLUCTUATIONS; HEAT TRANSFER; IMPEDANCE; METALS; SURFACES; VAN DER WAALS FORCES

Citation Formats

Bimonte, Giuseppe, and INFN, Sezione di Napoli, Naples. A Theory of Electromagnetic Fluctuations for Metallic Surfaces and van der Waals Interactions between Metallic Bodies. United States: N. p., 2006. Web. doi:10.1103/PhysRevLett.96.160401.
Bimonte, Giuseppe, & INFN, Sezione di Napoli, Naples. A Theory of Electromagnetic Fluctuations for Metallic Surfaces and van der Waals Interactions between Metallic Bodies. United States. doi:10.1103/PhysRevLett.96.160401.
Bimonte, Giuseppe, and INFN, Sezione di Napoli, Naples. Fri . "A Theory of Electromagnetic Fluctuations for Metallic Surfaces and van der Waals Interactions between Metallic Bodies". United States. doi:10.1103/PhysRevLett.96.160401.
@article{osti_20775178,
title = {A Theory of Electromagnetic Fluctuations for Metallic Surfaces and van der Waals Interactions between Metallic Bodies},
author = {Bimonte, Giuseppe and INFN, Sezione di Napoli, Naples},
abstractNote = {A new general expression is derived for the fluctuating electromagnetic field outside a metal surface in terms of its surface impedance. It provides a generalization to real metals of Lifshitz theory of molecular interactions between dielectric solids. The theory is used to compute the radiative heat transfer between two parallel metal surfaces at different temperatures. It is shown that a measurement of this quantity may provide an experimental resolution of a long-standing controversy about the effect of thermal corrections on the Casimir force between real metal plates.},
doi = {10.1103/PhysRevLett.96.160401},
journal = {Physical Review Letters},
number = 16,
volume = 96,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Apr 28 00:00:00 EDT 2006},
month = {Fri Apr 28 00:00:00 EDT 2006}
}
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