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Title: A computer simulation study comparing lesion detection accuracy with digital mammography, breast tomosynthesis, and cone-beam CT breast imaging

Abstract

Although conventional mammography is currently the best modality to detect early breast cancer, it is limited in that the recorded image represents the superposition of a three-dimensional (3D) object onto a 2D plane. Recently, two promising approaches for 3D volumetric breast imaging have been proposed, breast tomosynthesis (BT) and CT breast imaging (CTBI). To investigate possible improvements in lesion detection accuracy with either breast tomosynthesis or CT breast imaging as compared to digital mammography (DM), a computer simulation study was conducted using simulated lesions embedded into a structured 3D breast model. The computer simulation realistically modeled x-ray transport through a breast model, as well as the signal and noise propagation through a CsI based flat-panel imager. Polyenergetic x-ray spectra of Mo/Mo 28 kVp for digital mammography, Mo/Rh 28 kVp for BT, and W/Ce 50 kVp for CTBI were modeled. For the CTBI simulation, the intensity of the x-ray spectra for each projection view was determined so as to provide a total average glandular dose of 4 mGy, which is approximately equivalent to that given in conventional two-view screening mammography. The same total dose was modeled for both the DM and BT simulations. Irregular lesions were simulated by using a stochasticmore » growth algorithm providing lesions with an effective diameter of 5 mm. Breast tissue was simulated by generating an ensemble of backgrounds with a power law spectrum, with the composition of 50% fibroglandular and 50% adipose tissue. To evaluate lesion detection accuracy, a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) study was performed with five observers reading an ensemble of images for each case. The average area under the ROC curves (A{sub z}) was 0.76 for DM, 0.93 for BT, and 0.94 for CTBI. Results indicated that for the same dose, a 5 mm lesion embedded in a structured breast phantom was detected by the two volumetric breast imaging systems, BT and CTBI, with statistically significant higher confidence than with planar digital mammography, while the difference in lesion detection between BT and CTBI was not statistically significant.« less

Authors:
; ; ; ;  [1]
  1. Departments of Medical Physics and Radiation Oncology, Rush University Medical Center, 1653 W. Congress Parkway, Chicago, Illinois 60612 (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20775104
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Medical Physics
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 33; Journal Issue: 4; Other Information: DOI: 10.1118/1.2174127; (c) 2006 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA); Journal ID: ISSN 0094-2405
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; ACCURACY; ADIPOSE TISSUE; ALGORITHMS; BIOMEDICAL RADIOGRAPHY; CARCINOMAS; COMPUTERIZED SIMULATION; COMPUTERIZED TOMOGRAPHY; IMAGES; MAMMARY GLANDS; PHANTOMS; RADIATION DOSES; SENSITIVITY ANALYSIS; X-RAY SPECTRA

Citation Formats

Xing, Gong, Glick, Stephen J, Liu, Bob, Vedula, Aruna A, Thacker, Samta, Department of Radiology, University Massachusetts Medical School, 55 Lake Ave. North, Worcester, Massachusetts 01655, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, 55 Fruit Street, Boston, Massachusetts 02114, and Department of Radiology, University Massachusetts Medical School, 55 Lake Ave. North, Worcester, Massachusetts 01655. A computer simulation study comparing lesion detection accuracy with digital mammography, breast tomosynthesis, and cone-beam CT breast imaging. United States: N. p., 2006. Web. doi:10.1118/1.2174127.
Xing, Gong, Glick, Stephen J, Liu, Bob, Vedula, Aruna A, Thacker, Samta, Department of Radiology, University Massachusetts Medical School, 55 Lake Ave. North, Worcester, Massachusetts 01655, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, 55 Fruit Street, Boston, Massachusetts 02114, & Department of Radiology, University Massachusetts Medical School, 55 Lake Ave. North, Worcester, Massachusetts 01655. A computer simulation study comparing lesion detection accuracy with digital mammography, breast tomosynthesis, and cone-beam CT breast imaging. United States. https://doi.org/10.1118/1.2174127
Xing, Gong, Glick, Stephen J, Liu, Bob, Vedula, Aruna A, Thacker, Samta, Department of Radiology, University Massachusetts Medical School, 55 Lake Ave. North, Worcester, Massachusetts 01655, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, 55 Fruit Street, Boston, Massachusetts 02114, and Department of Radiology, University Massachusetts Medical School, 55 Lake Ave. North, Worcester, Massachusetts 01655. Sat . "A computer simulation study comparing lesion detection accuracy with digital mammography, breast tomosynthesis, and cone-beam CT breast imaging". United States. https://doi.org/10.1118/1.2174127.
@article{osti_20775104,
title = {A computer simulation study comparing lesion detection accuracy with digital mammography, breast tomosynthesis, and cone-beam CT breast imaging},
author = {Xing, Gong and Glick, Stephen J and Liu, Bob and Vedula, Aruna A and Thacker, Samta and Department of Radiology, University Massachusetts Medical School, 55 Lake Ave. North, Worcester, Massachusetts 01655 and Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, 55 Fruit Street, Boston, Massachusetts 02114 and Department of Radiology, University Massachusetts Medical School, 55 Lake Ave. North, Worcester, Massachusetts 01655},
abstractNote = {Although conventional mammography is currently the best modality to detect early breast cancer, it is limited in that the recorded image represents the superposition of a three-dimensional (3D) object onto a 2D plane. Recently, two promising approaches for 3D volumetric breast imaging have been proposed, breast tomosynthesis (BT) and CT breast imaging (CTBI). To investigate possible improvements in lesion detection accuracy with either breast tomosynthesis or CT breast imaging as compared to digital mammography (DM), a computer simulation study was conducted using simulated lesions embedded into a structured 3D breast model. The computer simulation realistically modeled x-ray transport through a breast model, as well as the signal and noise propagation through a CsI based flat-panel imager. Polyenergetic x-ray spectra of Mo/Mo 28 kVp for digital mammography, Mo/Rh 28 kVp for BT, and W/Ce 50 kVp for CTBI were modeled. For the CTBI simulation, the intensity of the x-ray spectra for each projection view was determined so as to provide a total average glandular dose of 4 mGy, which is approximately equivalent to that given in conventional two-view screening mammography. The same total dose was modeled for both the DM and BT simulations. Irregular lesions were simulated by using a stochastic growth algorithm providing lesions with an effective diameter of 5 mm. Breast tissue was simulated by generating an ensemble of backgrounds with a power law spectrum, with the composition of 50% fibroglandular and 50% adipose tissue. To evaluate lesion detection accuracy, a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) study was performed with five observers reading an ensemble of images for each case. The average area under the ROC curves (A{sub z}) was 0.76 for DM, 0.93 for BT, and 0.94 for CTBI. Results indicated that for the same dose, a 5 mm lesion embedded in a structured breast phantom was detected by the two volumetric breast imaging systems, BT and CTBI, with statistically significant higher confidence than with planar digital mammography, while the difference in lesion detection between BT and CTBI was not statistically significant.},
doi = {10.1118/1.2174127},
url = {https://www.osti.gov/biblio/20775104}, journal = {Medical Physics},
issn = {0094-2405},
number = 4,
volume = 33,
place = {United States},
year = {2006},
month = {4}
}