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Title: Cosmic superstring gravitational lensing phenomena: Predictions for networks of (p,q) strings

Abstract

The unique, conical space-time created by cosmic strings brings about distinctive gravitational lensing phenomena. The variety of these distinctive phenomena is increased when the strings have nontrivial mutual interactions. In particular, when strings bind and create junctions, rather than intercommute, the resulting configurations can lead to novel gravitational lensing patterns. In this brief note, we use exact solutions to characterize these phenomena, the detection of which would be strong evidence for the existence of complex cosmic string networks of the kind predicted by string theory-motivated cosmic string models. We also correct some common errors in the lensing phenomenology of straight cosmic strings.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [2]
  1. Laboratory for Elementary Particle Physics, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States)
  2. (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20774502
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Physical Review. D, Particles Fields; Journal Volume: 72; Journal Issue: 12; Other Information: DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevD.72.123504; (c) 2005 The American Physical Society; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
72 PHYSICS OF ELEMENTARY PARTICLES AND FIELDS; BASIC INTERACTIONS; COSMOLOGY; ERRORS; EXACT SOLUTIONS; GRAVITATIONAL LENSES; SPACE-TIME; SUPERSTRING MODELS

Citation Formats

Shlaer, Benjamin, Wyman, Mark, and Center for Radiophysics and Space Research, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853. Cosmic superstring gravitational lensing phenomena: Predictions for networks of (p,q) strings. United States: N. p., 2005. Web. doi:10.1103/PhysRevD.72.123504.
Shlaer, Benjamin, Wyman, Mark, & Center for Radiophysics and Space Research, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853. Cosmic superstring gravitational lensing phenomena: Predictions for networks of (p,q) strings. United States. doi:10.1103/PhysRevD.72.123504.
Shlaer, Benjamin, Wyman, Mark, and Center for Radiophysics and Space Research, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853. Thu . "Cosmic superstring gravitational lensing phenomena: Predictions for networks of (p,q) strings". United States. doi:10.1103/PhysRevD.72.123504.
@article{osti_20774502,
title = {Cosmic superstring gravitational lensing phenomena: Predictions for networks of (p,q) strings},
author = {Shlaer, Benjamin and Wyman, Mark and Center for Radiophysics and Space Research, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853},
abstractNote = {The unique, conical space-time created by cosmic strings brings about distinctive gravitational lensing phenomena. The variety of these distinctive phenomena is increased when the strings have nontrivial mutual interactions. In particular, when strings bind and create junctions, rather than intercommute, the resulting configurations can lead to novel gravitational lensing patterns. In this brief note, we use exact solutions to characterize these phenomena, the detection of which would be strong evidence for the existence of complex cosmic string networks of the kind predicted by string theory-motivated cosmic string models. We also correct some common errors in the lensing phenomenology of straight cosmic strings.},
doi = {10.1103/PhysRevD.72.123504},
journal = {Physical Review. D, Particles Fields},
number = 12,
volume = 72,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Dec 15 00:00:00 EST 2005},
month = {Thu Dec 15 00:00:00 EST 2005}
}
  • We use current theoretical estimates for the density of long cosmic strings to predict the number of strong gravitational lensing events in astronomical imaging surveys as a function of angular resolution and survey area. We show that angular resolution is the single most important factor, and that interesting limits on the dimensionless string tension G{mu}/c{sup 2} can be obtained by existing and planned surveys. At the resolution of the Hubble Space Telescope (0'.14), it is sufficient to survey of order a square degree -- well within reach of the current HST archive -- to probe the regime G{mu}/c{sup 2} {approx}more » 10{sup -8}. If lensing by cosmic strings is not detected, such a survey would improve the limit on the string tension by an order of magnitude on that available from the cosmic microwave background. At the resolution (0'.028) attainable with the next generation of large ground based instruments, both in the radio and the infra-red with adaptive optics, surveying a sky area of order ten square degrees will allow us to probe the G{mu}/c{sup 2} {approx} 10{sup -9} regime. These limits will not be improved significantly by increasing the solid angle of the survey.« less
  • The gravitational lensing by long, wiggly cosmic strings is shown to produce a large number of lensed images of a background source. In addition to pairs of images on either side of the string, a number of small images outline the string due to small-scale structure on the string. This image pattern could provide a highly distinctive signature of cosmic strings. Since the optical depth for multiple imaging of distant quasar sources by long strings may be comparable to that by galaxies, these image patterns should be clearly observable in the next generation of redshift surveys such as the Sloanmore » digital sky survey. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}« less
  • We consider the gravitational lensing produced by long cosmic strings formed in a grand-unified theory scale phase transition. We derive a formula for the deflection of photons which pass near the strings that reduces to an integral over the light cone projection of the string configuration plus constant terms which are not important for lensing. Our strings are produced by performing numerical simulations of cosmic string networks in flat, Minkowski space ignoring the effects of cosmological expansion. These strings have more small scale structure than those from an expanding universe simulation{emdash}fractal dimension 1.3 for Minkowski versus 1.1 for expanding{emdash}but sharemore » the same qualitative features. Lensing simulations show that for both pointlike and extended objects strings produce patterns unlike more traditional lenses, and, in particluar, the kinks in strings tend to generate demagnified images which reside close to the string. Thus lensing acts as a probe of the small scale structure of a string. Estimates of lensing probablity suggest that for string energy densities consistent with string seeded structure formation, on the order of tens of string lenses should be observed in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) quasar catalog. We propose a search strategy in which string lenses would be identified in the SDSS quasar survey, and the string nature of the lens can be confirmed by the observation of nearby high redshift galaxies which are also be lensed by the string. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}« less
  • We examine the effect of a Gaussian wave pulse, propagating along a cosmic string, on both the observed position and redshift of the double images of an object behind the string. We also calculate the effect of the string on a rectangular grid of stars which are located infinitely far behind the string. The calculations are done numerically using the exact metric for a traveling wave recently discovered by Garfinkle.
  • We point out that the results by Brandenberger et al. [Phys. Rev. D 77, 083502 (2008)] that the geometry around the straight cosmic strings with stationary junctions is flat to linear order in the string tension can be immediately extended to any order.