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Title: Upper limits from the LIGO and TAMA detectors on the rate of gravitational-wave bursts

Abstract

We report on the first joint search for gravitational waves by the TAMA and LIGO collaborations. We looked for millisecond-duration unmodeled gravitational-wave bursts in 473 hr of coincident data collected during early 2003. No candidate signals were found. We set an upper limit of 0.12 events per day on the rate of detectable gravitational-wave bursts, at 90% confidence level. From software simulations, we estimate that our detector network was sensitive to bursts with root-sum-square strain amplitude above approximately 1-3x10{sup -19} Hz{sup -1/2} in the frequency band 700-2000 Hz. We describe the details of this collaborative search, with particular emphasis on its advantages and disadvantages compared to searches by LIGO and TAMA separately using the same data. Benefits include a lower background and longer observation time, at some cost in sensitivity and bandwidth. We also demonstrate techniques for performing coincidence searches with a heterogeneous network of detectors with different noise spectra and orientations. These techniques include using coordinated software signal injections to estimate the network sensitivity, and tuning the analysis to maximize the sensitivity and the livetime, subject to constraints on the background.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;  [1]
  1. LIGO-California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States) (and others)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20774492
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Physical Review. D, Particles Fields; Journal Volume: 72; Journal Issue: 12; Other Information: DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevD.72.122004; (c) 2005 The American Physical Society; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
72 PHYSICS OF ELEMENTARY PARTICLES AND FIELDS; 46 INSTRUMENTATION RELATED TO NUCLEAR SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY; AMPLITUDES; COMPUTER CODES; COMPUTERIZED SIMULATION; COSMOLOGY; GRAVITATIONAL WAVE DETECTORS; GRAVITATIONAL WAVES; INTERFEROMETRY; ORIENTATION; SENSITIVITY; VISIBLE RADIATION

Citation Formats

Abbott, B., Abbott, R., Adhikari, R., Agresti, J., Anderson, S.B., Araya, M., Armandula, H., Asiri, F., Barish, B.C., Barnes, M., Barton, M.A., Bhawal, B., Billingsley, G., Black, E., Blackburn, K., Bork, R., Brown, D. A., Busby, D., Cardenas, L., and Chandler, A. Upper limits from the LIGO and TAMA detectors on the rate of gravitational-wave bursts. United States: N. p., 2005. Web. doi:10.1103/PhysRevD.72.122004.
Abbott, B., Abbott, R., Adhikari, R., Agresti, J., Anderson, S.B., Araya, M., Armandula, H., Asiri, F., Barish, B.C., Barnes, M., Barton, M.A., Bhawal, B., Billingsley, G., Black, E., Blackburn, K., Bork, R., Brown, D. A., Busby, D., Cardenas, L., & Chandler, A. Upper limits from the LIGO and TAMA detectors on the rate of gravitational-wave bursts. United States. doi:10.1103/PhysRevD.72.122004.
Abbott, B., Abbott, R., Adhikari, R., Agresti, J., Anderson, S.B., Araya, M., Armandula, H., Asiri, F., Barish, B.C., Barnes, M., Barton, M.A., Bhawal, B., Billingsley, G., Black, E., Blackburn, K., Bork, R., Brown, D. A., Busby, D., Cardenas, L., and Chandler, A. Thu . "Upper limits from the LIGO and TAMA detectors on the rate of gravitational-wave bursts". United States. doi:10.1103/PhysRevD.72.122004.
@article{osti_20774492,
title = {Upper limits from the LIGO and TAMA detectors on the rate of gravitational-wave bursts},
author = {Abbott, B. and Abbott, R. and Adhikari, R. and Agresti, J. and Anderson, S.B. and Araya, M. and Armandula, H. and Asiri, F. and Barish, B.C. and Barnes, M. and Barton, M.A. and Bhawal, B. and Billingsley, G. and Black, E. and Blackburn, K. and Bork, R. and Brown, D. A. and Busby, D. and Cardenas, L. and Chandler, A.},
abstractNote = {We report on the first joint search for gravitational waves by the TAMA and LIGO collaborations. We looked for millisecond-duration unmodeled gravitational-wave bursts in 473 hr of coincident data collected during early 2003. No candidate signals were found. We set an upper limit of 0.12 events per day on the rate of detectable gravitational-wave bursts, at 90% confidence level. From software simulations, we estimate that our detector network was sensitive to bursts with root-sum-square strain amplitude above approximately 1-3x10{sup -19} Hz{sup -1/2} in the frequency band 700-2000 Hz. We describe the details of this collaborative search, with particular emphasis on its advantages and disadvantages compared to searches by LIGO and TAMA separately using the same data. Benefits include a lower background and longer observation time, at some cost in sensitivity and bandwidth. We also demonstrate techniques for performing coincidence searches with a heterogeneous network of detectors with different noise spectra and orientations. These techniques include using coordinated software signal injections to estimate the network sensitivity, and tuning the analysis to maximize the sensitivity and the livetime, subject to constraints on the background.},
doi = {10.1103/PhysRevD.72.122004},
journal = {Physical Review. D, Particles Fields},
number = 12,
volume = 72,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Dec 15 00:00:00 EST 2005},
month = {Thu Dec 15 00:00:00 EST 2005}
}
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