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Title: Biased Metropolis-heat-bath algorithm for fundamental-adjoint SU(2) lattice gauge theory

Abstract

For SU(2) lattice gauge theory with the fundamental-adjoint action an efficient heat-bath algorithm is not known so that one had to rely on Metropolis simulations supplemented by overrelaxation. Implementing a novel biased Metropolis-heat-bath algorithm for this model, we find improvement factors in the range 1.45 to 2.06 over conventionally optimized Metropolis simulations. If one optimizes further with respect to additional overrelaxation sweeps, the improvement factors are found in the range 1.3 to 1.8.

Authors:
;  [1];  [2];  [3]
  1. Department of Physics, Florida State University, Tallahassee, Florida 32306-4350 (United States)
  2. (United States)
  3. American Physical Society, One Research Road, Box 9000, Ridge, New York 11961 (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20774472
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Physical Review. D, Particles Fields; Journal Volume: 72; Journal Issue: 11; Other Information: DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevD.72.117501; (c) 2005 The American Physical Society; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
72 PHYSICS OF ELEMENTARY PARTICLES AND FIELDS; ACTION INTEGRAL; ALGORITHMS; COMPUTERIZED SIMULATION; GAUGE INVARIANCE; LATTICE FIELD THEORY; SU-2 GROUPS

Citation Formats

Bazavov, Alexei, Berg, Bernd A., School of Computational Science, Florida State University, Tallahassee, Florida 32306-4120, and Heller, Urs M.. Biased Metropolis-heat-bath algorithm for fundamental-adjoint SU(2) lattice gauge theory. United States: N. p., 2005. Web. doi:10.1103/PhysRevD.72.117501.
Bazavov, Alexei, Berg, Bernd A., School of Computational Science, Florida State University, Tallahassee, Florida 32306-4120, & Heller, Urs M.. Biased Metropolis-heat-bath algorithm for fundamental-adjoint SU(2) lattice gauge theory. United States. doi:10.1103/PhysRevD.72.117501.
Bazavov, Alexei, Berg, Bernd A., School of Computational Science, Florida State University, Tallahassee, Florida 32306-4120, and Heller, Urs M.. Thu . "Biased Metropolis-heat-bath algorithm for fundamental-adjoint SU(2) lattice gauge theory". United States. doi:10.1103/PhysRevD.72.117501.
@article{osti_20774472,
title = {Biased Metropolis-heat-bath algorithm for fundamental-adjoint SU(2) lattice gauge theory},
author = {Bazavov, Alexei and Berg, Bernd A. and School of Computational Science, Florida State University, Tallahassee, Florida 32306-4120 and Heller, Urs M.},
abstractNote = {For SU(2) lattice gauge theory with the fundamental-adjoint action an efficient heat-bath algorithm is not known so that one had to rely on Metropolis simulations supplemented by overrelaxation. Implementing a novel biased Metropolis-heat-bath algorithm for this model, we find improvement factors in the range 1.45 to 2.06 over conventionally optimized Metropolis simulations. If one optimizes further with respect to additional overrelaxation sweeps, the improvement factors are found in the range 1.3 to 1.8.},
doi = {10.1103/PhysRevD.72.117501},
journal = {Physical Review. D, Particles Fields},
number = 11,
volume = 72,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Dec 01 00:00:00 EST 2005},
month = {Thu Dec 01 00:00:00 EST 2005}
}
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