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Title: Laser beams with embedded vortices: tools for atom optics

Abstract

Two-dimensional spatial light modulators have been employed to create static and dynamic phase masks for embedding multiple vortices and exotic intensity-void structures in laser beams. A variety of patterns of singularities, producing dark longitudinal and transverse intensity channels, have been created. The uniformity, quality, and suitability of these patterns as elements for atom optics (e.g., atom-tunnel beam splitters) have been studied as a function of the phase quantization level and spatial resolution of the phase mask. Specifically, we show that (1) high-quality modes, those that propagate long distances and can be focused, can be generated when the number of phase steps between 0 and 2{pi} on the phase mask exceed four and (2) atom confinement increases with the charge of the vortex.

Authors:
; ; ; ;  [1];  [2];  [2];  [2];  [2]
  1. Department of Physics and Institute of Physical Science and Technology, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States)
  2. (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20768701
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Journal of the Optical Society of America. Part B, Optical Physics; Journal Volume: 23; Journal Issue: 1; Other Information: DOI: 10.1364/JOSAB.23.000094; (c) 2006 Optical Society of America; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; ATOMS; BEAM OPTICS; CONFINEMENT; FOCUSING; LASERS; QUANTIZATION; RADIATION PRESSURE; SINGULARITY; SPATIAL RESOLUTION; TWO-DIMENSIONAL CALCULATIONS; VORTICES

Citation Formats

Chattrapiban, Narupon, Rogers, Elizabeth A., Arakelyan, Ilya V., Roy, Rajarshi, Hill, Wendell T. III, Department of Physics and Institute for Research in Electronics and Applied Physics, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742, Department of Physics and Institute of Physical Science and Technology, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742, Institute of Physical Science and Technology, Department of Physics, and Institute for Research in Electronics and Applied Physics University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742, and Institute of Physical Science and Technology and Department of Physics, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742. Laser beams with embedded vortices: tools for atom optics. United States: N. p., 2006. Web. doi:10.1364/JOSAB.23.000094.
Chattrapiban, Narupon, Rogers, Elizabeth A., Arakelyan, Ilya V., Roy, Rajarshi, Hill, Wendell T. III, Department of Physics and Institute for Research in Electronics and Applied Physics, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742, Department of Physics and Institute of Physical Science and Technology, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742, Institute of Physical Science and Technology, Department of Physics, and Institute for Research in Electronics and Applied Physics University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742, & Institute of Physical Science and Technology and Department of Physics, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742. Laser beams with embedded vortices: tools for atom optics. United States. doi:10.1364/JOSAB.23.000094.
Chattrapiban, Narupon, Rogers, Elizabeth A., Arakelyan, Ilya V., Roy, Rajarshi, Hill, Wendell T. III, Department of Physics and Institute for Research in Electronics and Applied Physics, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742, Department of Physics and Institute of Physical Science and Technology, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742, Institute of Physical Science and Technology, Department of Physics, and Institute for Research in Electronics and Applied Physics University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742, and Institute of Physical Science and Technology and Department of Physics, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742. Sun . "Laser beams with embedded vortices: tools for atom optics". United States. doi:10.1364/JOSAB.23.000094.
@article{osti_20768701,
title = {Laser beams with embedded vortices: tools for atom optics},
author = {Chattrapiban, Narupon and Rogers, Elizabeth A. and Arakelyan, Ilya V. and Roy, Rajarshi and Hill, Wendell T. III and Department of Physics and Institute for Research in Electronics and Applied Physics, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 and Department of Physics and Institute of Physical Science and Technology, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 and Institute of Physical Science and Technology, Department of Physics, and Institute for Research in Electronics and Applied Physics University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 and Institute of Physical Science and Technology and Department of Physics, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742},
abstractNote = {Two-dimensional spatial light modulators have been employed to create static and dynamic phase masks for embedding multiple vortices and exotic intensity-void structures in laser beams. A variety of patterns of singularities, producing dark longitudinal and transverse intensity channels, have been created. The uniformity, quality, and suitability of these patterns as elements for atom optics (e.g., atom-tunnel beam splitters) have been studied as a function of the phase quantization level and spatial resolution of the phase mask. Specifically, we show that (1) high-quality modes, those that propagate long distances and can be focused, can be generated when the number of phase steps between 0 and 2{pi} on the phase mask exceed four and (2) atom confinement increases with the charge of the vortex.},
doi = {10.1364/JOSAB.23.000094},
journal = {Journal of the Optical Society of America. Part B, Optical Physics},
number = 1,
volume = 23,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Jan 15 00:00:00 EST 2006},
month = {Sun Jan 15 00:00:00 EST 2006}
}
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