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Title: Thermal decomposition behaviors of lignite by pyrolysis-FTIR

Abstract

An in situ pyrolysis reactor combined with the Fourier transformation infrared spectrometer (PFTIR) technique is employed to study the coal structure and its thermal decomposition behaviors. The interface of pyroprobe with FTIR was designed delicately to ensure the path of the laser beam in FTIR was just 3 {mu}m above the coal sample, so any detection information of products from coal pyrolysis would be acquired previous to the secondary reaction. The PFTIR technique can be adopted to determine the activation energy of coal pyrolysis. Lignite coal has been used to evaluate this new method. The thermal decomposition behaviors of functional groups from lignite pyrolysis coincide with the first-order reaction.

Authors:
; ;  [1]
  1. Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan (China)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20762139
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Energy Sources, Part A: Recovery, Utilization, and Environmental Effects; Journal Volume: 28; Journal Issue: 2
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
01 COAL, LIGNITE, AND PEAT; PYROLYSIS; LIGNITE; INFRARED SPECTRA; FOURIER TRANSFORM SPECTROMETERS; MOLECULAR STRUCTURE; LASERS; PYROLYSIS PRODUCTS; PYROLYTIC GASES

Citation Formats

Feng, J., Li, W.Y., and Xie, K.C. Thermal decomposition behaviors of lignite by pyrolysis-FTIR. United States: N. p., 2006. Web. doi:10.1080/009083190889889.
Feng, J., Li, W.Y., & Xie, K.C. Thermal decomposition behaviors of lignite by pyrolysis-FTIR. United States. doi:10.1080/009083190889889.
Feng, J., Li, W.Y., and Xie, K.C. Sat . "Thermal decomposition behaviors of lignite by pyrolysis-FTIR". United States. doi:10.1080/009083190889889.
@article{osti_20762139,
title = {Thermal decomposition behaviors of lignite by pyrolysis-FTIR},
author = {Feng, J. and Li, W.Y. and Xie, K.C.},
abstractNote = {An in situ pyrolysis reactor combined with the Fourier transformation infrared spectrometer (PFTIR) technique is employed to study the coal structure and its thermal decomposition behaviors. The interface of pyroprobe with FTIR was designed delicately to ensure the path of the laser beam in FTIR was just 3 {mu}m above the coal sample, so any detection information of products from coal pyrolysis would be acquired previous to the secondary reaction. The PFTIR technique can be adopted to determine the activation energy of coal pyrolysis. Lignite coal has been used to evaluate this new method. The thermal decomposition behaviors of functional groups from lignite pyrolysis coincide with the first-order reaction.},
doi = {10.1080/009083190889889},
journal = {Energy Sources, Part A: Recovery, Utilization, and Environmental Effects},
number = 2,
volume = 28,
place = {United States},
year = {Sat Jan 21 00:00:00 EST 2006},
month = {Sat Jan 21 00:00:00 EST 2006}
}
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