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Title: Scavenging of pollutant acid substances by Asian mineral dust particles - article no. L07816

Abstract

Uptakes of sulfate and nitrate onto Asian dust particles during transport from the Asian continent to the Pacific Ocean were analyzed by using a single-particle time-of-flight mass spectrometer. Observation was conducted at Tsukuba in Japan in the springtime of 2004. Sulfate-rich dust particles made their largest contribution during the 'dust event' in the middle of April 2004. As a result of detailed analysis including backward trajectory calculations, it was confirmed that sulfate components originating from coal combustion in the continent were internally mixed with dust particles. Even in the downstream of the outflow far from the continental coastline, significant contribution of Asian dust to sulfate was observed. Asian dust plays critical roles as the carrier of sulfate over the Pacific Ocean.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ;  [1]
  1. National Institute of Environmental Science, Ibaraki (Japan)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20752366
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Geophysical Research Letters; Journal Volume: 33; Journal Issue: 7
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
01 COAL, LIGNITE, AND PEAT; 54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; DUSTS; PARTICULATES; ASIA; SULFATES; NITRATES; JAPAN; POLLUTION SOURCES; COMBUSTION; COAL; PACIFIC OCEAN

Citation Formats

Matsumoto, J., Takahashi, K., Matsumi, Y., Yabushita, A., Shimizu, A., Matsui, I., and Sugimoto, N.. Scavenging of pollutant acid substances by Asian mineral dust particles - article no. L07816. United States: N. p., 2006. Web.
Matsumoto, J., Takahashi, K., Matsumi, Y., Yabushita, A., Shimizu, A., Matsui, I., & Sugimoto, N.. Scavenging of pollutant acid substances by Asian mineral dust particles - article no. L07816. United States.
Matsumoto, J., Takahashi, K., Matsumi, Y., Yabushita, A., Shimizu, A., Matsui, I., and Sugimoto, N.. Thu . "Scavenging of pollutant acid substances by Asian mineral dust particles - article no. L07816". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_20752366,
title = {Scavenging of pollutant acid substances by Asian mineral dust particles - article no. L07816},
author = {Matsumoto, J. and Takahashi, K. and Matsumi, Y. and Yabushita, A. and Shimizu, A. and Matsui, I. and Sugimoto, N.},
abstractNote = {Uptakes of sulfate and nitrate onto Asian dust particles during transport from the Asian continent to the Pacific Ocean were analyzed by using a single-particle time-of-flight mass spectrometer. Observation was conducted at Tsukuba in Japan in the springtime of 2004. Sulfate-rich dust particles made their largest contribution during the 'dust event' in the middle of April 2004. As a result of detailed analysis including backward trajectory calculations, it was confirmed that sulfate components originating from coal combustion in the continent were internally mixed with dust particles. Even in the downstream of the outflow far from the continental coastline, significant contribution of Asian dust to sulfate was observed. Asian dust plays critical roles as the carrier of sulfate over the Pacific Ocean.},
doi = {},
journal = {Geophysical Research Letters},
number = 7,
volume = 33,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Apr 13 00:00:00 EDT 2006},
month = {Thu Apr 13 00:00:00 EDT 2006}
}
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