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Title: Keeping condensers clean

Abstract

The humble condenser is among the biggest contributors to a steam power plant's efficiency. But although a clean condenser can provide great economic benefit, a dirty one can raise plant heat rate, resulting in large losses of generation revenue and/or unnecessarily high fuel bills. Conventional methods for cleaning fouled tubes range form chemicals to scrapers to brushes and hydro-blasters. This article compares the available options and describes how one power station, Omaha Public Power District's 600 MW North Omaha coal-fired power station, cleaned up its act. The makeup and cooling water of all its five units comes from the Missouri River. 6 figs.

Authors:
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20752247
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Power (New York); Journal Volume: 150; Journal Issue: 3
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
20 FOSSIL-FUELED POWER PLANTS; FOSSIL-FUEL POWER PLANTS; DEPOSITION; CORROSION; FOULING; COAL; BACTERIA; CONDENSER; TUBES; HEAT TRANSFER; CLEANING; CALCIUM CARBONATES; REMOVAL; COOLING SYSTEMS; CALCITE; USA; NEVADA

Citation Formats

Wicker, K. Keeping condensers clean. United States: N. p., 2006. Web.
Wicker, K. Keeping condensers clean. United States.
Wicker, K. Sat . "Keeping condensers clean". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_20752247,
title = {Keeping condensers clean},
author = {Wicker, K.},
abstractNote = {The humble condenser is among the biggest contributors to a steam power plant's efficiency. But although a clean condenser can provide great economic benefit, a dirty one can raise plant heat rate, resulting in large losses of generation revenue and/or unnecessarily high fuel bills. Conventional methods for cleaning fouled tubes range form chemicals to scrapers to brushes and hydro-blasters. This article compares the available options and describes how one power station, Omaha Public Power District's 600 MW North Omaha coal-fired power station, cleaned up its act. The makeup and cooling water of all its five units comes from the Missouri River. 6 figs.},
doi = {},
journal = {Power (New York)},
number = 3,
volume = 150,
place = {United States},
year = {Sat Apr 15 00:00:00 EDT 2006},
month = {Sat Apr 15 00:00:00 EDT 2006}
}