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Title: Trappean magmatism as the basic cause of coal metamorphism and hydrocarbon generation in the Tungus Coal Basin

Abstract

A survey is presented for coal reserves and possible amounts of methane and other gases in the Tungus Coal Basin, where brown coal is metamorphized to various (down to anthracites) stages under the action of heat generated by many trappean intrusions. There is a presumption that some hydrocarbon gases are in a fossil state.

Authors:
; ;  [1]
  1. Russian Academy of Science, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20752220
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Journal of Mining Science (English Translation); Journal Volume: 41; Journal Issue: 6
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
01 COAL, LIGNITE, AND PEAT; METHANE; COAL RESERVES; SEDIMENTARY BASINS; COAL DEPOSITS; METAMORPHISM; IGNEOUS ROCKS; COAL RANK; RUSSIAN FEDERATION

Citation Formats

Pavlov, A.L., Khomenko, A.V., and Gordeeva, A.O. Trappean magmatism as the basic cause of coal metamorphism and hydrocarbon generation in the Tungus Coal Basin. United States: N. p., 2005. Web. doi:10.1007/s10913-006-0019-6.
Pavlov, A.L., Khomenko, A.V., & Gordeeva, A.O. Trappean magmatism as the basic cause of coal metamorphism and hydrocarbon generation in the Tungus Coal Basin. United States. doi:10.1007/s10913-006-0019-6.
Pavlov, A.L., Khomenko, A.V., and Gordeeva, A.O. Tue . "Trappean magmatism as the basic cause of coal metamorphism and hydrocarbon generation in the Tungus Coal Basin". United States. doi:10.1007/s10913-006-0019-6.
@article{osti_20752220,
title = {Trappean magmatism as the basic cause of coal metamorphism and hydrocarbon generation in the Tungus Coal Basin},
author = {Pavlov, A.L. and Khomenko, A.V. and Gordeeva, A.O.},
abstractNote = {A survey is presented for coal reserves and possible amounts of methane and other gases in the Tungus Coal Basin, where brown coal is metamorphized to various (down to anthracites) stages under the action of heat generated by many trappean intrusions. There is a presumption that some hydrocarbon gases are in a fossil state.},
doi = {10.1007/s10913-006-0019-6},
journal = {Journal of Mining Science (English Translation)},
number = 6,
volume = 41,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Nov 15 00:00:00 EST 2005},
month = {Tue Nov 15 00:00:00 EST 2005}
}
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