skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: American exceptionalism? Similarities and differences in national attitudes toward energy policy and global warming

Abstract

Despite sharp differences in government policy, the views of the U.S. public on energy and global warming are remarkably similar to those in Sweden, Britain, and Japan. Americans do exhibit some differences, placing lower priority on the environment and global warming, and with fewer believing that 'global warming has been established as a serious problem and immediate action is necessary'. There also remains a small hard core of skeptics (<10%) who do not believe in the science of climate change and the need for action, a group that is much smaller in the other countries surveyed. The similarities are, however, pervasive. Similar preferences are manifest across a wide range of technology and fuel choices, in support of renewables, in research priorities, in a basic understanding of which technologies produce or reduce carbon dioxide (or misunderstandings in the case of nuclear power), and in willingness to pay for solving global warming. 29 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ;  [1]
  1. University of Cambridge, Cambridge (United Kingdom). Judge Business School
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20752112
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Environmental Science and Technology; Journal Volume: 40; Journal Issue: 7; Other Information: dmr40@cam.ac.uk
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY AND ECONOMY; 54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; 01 COAL, LIGNITE, AND PEAT; 17 WIND ENERGY; 21 SPECIFIC NUCLEAR REACTORS AND ASSOCIATED PLANTS; USA; ENERGY POLICY; GREENHOUSE EFFECT; ATTITUDES; SWEDEN; UNITED KINGDOM; JAPAN; CLIMATIC CHANGE; PUBLIC OPINION; NUCLEAR POWER; RENEWABLE ENERGY SOURCES; CARBON DIOXIDE; EMISSION; POWER GENERATION; MITIGATION; CARBON SEQUESTRATION; ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS; TECHNOLOGY IMPACTS; POLITICAL ASPECTS; ENERGY EFFICIENCY; NUCLEAR ENERGY; CAPTURE; UNDERGROUND STORAGE; OZONE; ACID RAIN; WATER POLLUTION; TOXIC MATERIALS; RESOURCE DEPLETION; VEHICLES; COAL; FOSSIL-FUEL POWER PLANTS; TREES; WIND TURBINES

Citation Formats

D.M. Reiner, T.E. Curry, M.A. de Figueiredo, H.J. Herzog, S.D. Ansolabehere, K. Itaoka, F. Johnsson, and M. Odenberger. American exceptionalism? Similarities and differences in national attitudes toward energy policy and global warming. United States: N. p., 2006. Web. doi:10.1021/es052010b.
D.M. Reiner, T.E. Curry, M.A. de Figueiredo, H.J. Herzog, S.D. Ansolabehere, K. Itaoka, F. Johnsson, & M. Odenberger. American exceptionalism? Similarities and differences in national attitudes toward energy policy and global warming. United States. doi:10.1021/es052010b.
D.M. Reiner, T.E. Curry, M.A. de Figueiredo, H.J. Herzog, S.D. Ansolabehere, K. Itaoka, F. Johnsson, and M. Odenberger. Sat . "American exceptionalism? Similarities and differences in national attitudes toward energy policy and global warming". United States. doi:10.1021/es052010b.
@article{osti_20752112,
title = {American exceptionalism? Similarities and differences in national attitudes toward energy policy and global warming},
author = {D.M. Reiner and T.E. Curry and M.A. de Figueiredo and H.J. Herzog and S.D. Ansolabehere and K. Itaoka and F. Johnsson and M. Odenberger},
abstractNote = {Despite sharp differences in government policy, the views of the U.S. public on energy and global warming are remarkably similar to those in Sweden, Britain, and Japan. Americans do exhibit some differences, placing lower priority on the environment and global warming, and with fewer believing that 'global warming has been established as a serious problem and immediate action is necessary'. There also remains a small hard core of skeptics (<10%) who do not believe in the science of climate change and the need for action, a group that is much smaller in the other countries surveyed. The similarities are, however, pervasive. Similar preferences are manifest across a wide range of technology and fuel choices, in support of renewables, in research priorities, in a basic understanding of which technologies produce or reduce carbon dioxide (or misunderstandings in the case of nuclear power), and in willingness to pay for solving global warming. 29 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.},
doi = {10.1021/es052010b},
journal = {Environmental Science and Technology},
number = 7,
volume = 40,
place = {United States},
year = {Sat Apr 01 00:00:00 EST 2006},
month = {Sat Apr 01 00:00:00 EST 2006}
}
  • No abstract prepared.
  • The APPA supports the historic pattern of pluralism in the electric utility industry. Institutional competition between investor, publicly, and cooperatively owned utilities provides clear benefits to all customers. The Federal government has an important role to play in protecting it. Even with conservative growth assumptions, major expansion of electric facilities is required in the next 10 years. The nation faces a massive problem in providing the fuel generating capacity, and other requirements that must be met. Coal, nuclear power, and conservation must perform significant roles because there are no acceptable or feasible alternatives. Environmental and energy needs must be balanced.more » Efforts must be made to hold down consumer costs. Federal action is needed. Problems and solutions that should be considered are presented for: fuels, nuclear fuels, reorganization of regulatory agencies, regulations, hydroelectric power, conservation, antitrust, the environment, and prices. The directors close their policy statement as follows: ''if there is not a national commitment on the part of the Federal government to see that the nation's energy requirements are met, plans should be formulated now for mandatory curtailment of electricity.'' (MCW)« less
  • Government officials, representatives from EPA, industry, and environmental groups were among those testifying at a hearing on the Federal agencies response to the scientific evidence of global climate change and to receive statements on S. 2667, the National Energy Policy Act of 1988. One of the purposes of this hearing was to underline the administration responsibilities. Various Federal agencies must coordinate their efforts and lead, not stand by and let our climate change while we study the issue. Global atmospheric concentrations of carbon dioxide have been steadily increasing since the advent of the industrial age. During the last 150 years,more » the level of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere has risen from 280 ppm to 350 ppm. Since 1958, concentrations have increased by about 40 ppm in that short period of time alone.« less
  • A bill has been introduced to establish a national energy policy to reduce global warming and other purposes. The bill is entitled the National Energy Policy Act of 1988. The overall purpose of this Act is to establish a national energy policy that will reduce generation of carbon dioxide the trace gases as quickly as is feasible in order to reduce to the maximum extent practicable, risks associated with an atmospheric warming and global climate change. One of the goals of this legislation is to reduce the level of carbon dioxide introduced into the atmosphere by at least 20% bymore » the year 2000.« less
  • This bill was introduced into the U.S. House of Representatives on October 17, 1990. The purpose of this act is to establish a national energy strategy for energy research and development that will lead to energy technologies that reduce the contribution of energy to potential changes in global climate caused by increasing concentrations of greenhouse gases. In addition, this energy policy will reduce the U.S. dependence on foreign energy consistent with the achievement of other domestic energy, economic, social, and environmental goals. Other elements of this bill concern research and development in the areas of: hydrogen; hydrogen-fueled aircraft; advanced nuclearmore » reactor technology; fusion energy; hydrocarbons; transportation; energy efficiency technologies; and methane assessment.« less