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Title: American exceptionalism? Similarities and differences in national attitudes toward energy policy and global warming

Abstract

Despite sharp differences in government policy, the views of the U.S. public on energy and global warming are remarkably similar to those in Sweden, Britain, and Japan. Americans do exhibit some differences, placing lower priority on the environment and global warming, and with fewer believing that 'global warming has been established as a serious problem and immediate action is necessary'. There also remains a small hard core of skeptics (<10%) who do not believe in the science of climate change and the need for action, a group that is much smaller in the other countries surveyed. The similarities are, however, pervasive. Similar preferences are manifest across a wide range of technology and fuel choices, in support of renewables, in research priorities, in a basic understanding of which technologies produce or reduce carbon dioxide (or misunderstandings in the case of nuclear power), and in willingness to pay for solving global warming. 29 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ;  [1]
  1. University of Cambridge, Cambridge (United Kingdom). Judge Business School
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20752112
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Environmental Science and Technology; Journal Volume: 40; Journal Issue: 7; Other Information: dmr40@cam.ac.uk
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY AND ECONOMY; 54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; 01 COAL, LIGNITE, AND PEAT; 17 WIND ENERGY; 21 SPECIFIC NUCLEAR REACTORS AND ASSOCIATED PLANTS; USA; ENERGY POLICY; GREENHOUSE EFFECT; ATTITUDES; SWEDEN; UNITED KINGDOM; JAPAN; CLIMATIC CHANGE; PUBLIC OPINION; NUCLEAR POWER; RENEWABLE ENERGY SOURCES; CARBON DIOXIDE; EMISSION; POWER GENERATION; MITIGATION; CARBON SEQUESTRATION; ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS; TECHNOLOGY IMPACTS; POLITICAL ASPECTS; ENERGY EFFICIENCY; NUCLEAR ENERGY; CAPTURE; UNDERGROUND STORAGE; OZONE; ACID RAIN; WATER POLLUTION; TOXIC MATERIALS; RESOURCE DEPLETION; VEHICLES; COAL; FOSSIL-FUEL POWER PLANTS; TREES; WIND TURBINES

Citation Formats

D.M. Reiner, T.E. Curry, M.A. de Figueiredo, H.J. Herzog, S.D. Ansolabehere, K. Itaoka, F. Johnsson, and M. Odenberger. American exceptionalism? Similarities and differences in national attitudes toward energy policy and global warming. United States: N. p., 2006. Web. doi:10.1021/es052010b.
D.M. Reiner, T.E. Curry, M.A. de Figueiredo, H.J. Herzog, S.D. Ansolabehere, K. Itaoka, F. Johnsson, & M. Odenberger. American exceptionalism? Similarities and differences in national attitudes toward energy policy and global warming. United States. doi:10.1021/es052010b.
D.M. Reiner, T.E. Curry, M.A. de Figueiredo, H.J. Herzog, S.D. Ansolabehere, K. Itaoka, F. Johnsson, and M. Odenberger. Sat . "American exceptionalism? Similarities and differences in national attitudes toward energy policy and global warming". United States. doi:10.1021/es052010b.
@article{osti_20752112,
title = {American exceptionalism? Similarities and differences in national attitudes toward energy policy and global warming},
author = {D.M. Reiner and T.E. Curry and M.A. de Figueiredo and H.J. Herzog and S.D. Ansolabehere and K. Itaoka and F. Johnsson and M. Odenberger},
abstractNote = {Despite sharp differences in government policy, the views of the U.S. public on energy and global warming are remarkably similar to those in Sweden, Britain, and Japan. Americans do exhibit some differences, placing lower priority on the environment and global warming, and with fewer believing that 'global warming has been established as a serious problem and immediate action is necessary'. There also remains a small hard core of skeptics (<10%) who do not believe in the science of climate change and the need for action, a group that is much smaller in the other countries surveyed. The similarities are, however, pervasive. Similar preferences are manifest across a wide range of technology and fuel choices, in support of renewables, in research priorities, in a basic understanding of which technologies produce or reduce carbon dioxide (or misunderstandings in the case of nuclear power), and in willingness to pay for solving global warming. 29 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.},
doi = {10.1021/es052010b},
journal = {Environmental Science and Technology},
number = 7,
volume = 40,
place = {United States},
year = {Sat Apr 01 00:00:00 EST 2006},
month = {Sat Apr 01 00:00:00 EST 2006}
}