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Title: Structural study of zirconia nanoclusters by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy

Abstract

Monodisperse and uniformly spherical ZrO{sub 2} nanostructured clusters have been synthesized by microwave-assisted sol-gel processing. The techniques used produced molecular-structured precipitates from which zirconia nanometric particles were easily obtained. These particles retained their stability during the subsequent separation process. The microwave treatment was proven to be highly beneficial for assisting the sol-gel processing, mainly because of its contribution to the mixed dispersion and thermal effects. The zirconia nanoclusters thus formed were subsequently characterized by high-resolution electron microscopy to study the nanostructural morphology and transformation defects.

Authors:
; ; ;
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20748627
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Materials Characterization; Journal Volume: 52; Journal Issue: 3; Other Information: DOI: 10.1016/j.matchar.2004.01.007; PII: S1044580304000440; Copyright (c) 2004 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, The Netherlands, All rights reserved; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; DEFECTS; DISPERSIONS; MICROWAVE RADIATION; MORPHOLOGY; NANOSTRUCTURES; PARTICLES; PROCESSING; SEPARATION PROCESSES; SOL-GEL PROCESS; SPHERICAL CONFIGURATION; STABILITY; TEMPERATURE DEPENDENCE; TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY; ZIRCONIUM OXIDES

Citation Formats

Delgado-Arellano, V.G., Espitia-Cabrera, M.I., Reyes-Gasga, J., and Contreras-Garcia, M.E. Structural study of zirconia nanoclusters by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. United States: N. p., 2004. Web. doi:10.1016/j.matchar.2004.01.007.
Delgado-Arellano, V.G., Espitia-Cabrera, M.I., Reyes-Gasga, J., & Contreras-Garcia, M.E. Structural study of zirconia nanoclusters by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. United States. doi:10.1016/j.matchar.2004.01.007.
Delgado-Arellano, V.G., Espitia-Cabrera, M.I., Reyes-Gasga, J., and Contreras-Garcia, M.E. 2004. "Structural study of zirconia nanoclusters by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy". United States. doi:10.1016/j.matchar.2004.01.007.
@article{osti_20748627,
title = {Structural study of zirconia nanoclusters by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy},
author = {Delgado-Arellano, V.G. and Espitia-Cabrera, M.I. and Reyes-Gasga, J. and Contreras-Garcia, M.E},
abstractNote = {Monodisperse and uniformly spherical ZrO{sub 2} nanostructured clusters have been synthesized by microwave-assisted sol-gel processing. The techniques used produced molecular-structured precipitates from which zirconia nanometric particles were easily obtained. These particles retained their stability during the subsequent separation process. The microwave treatment was proven to be highly beneficial for assisting the sol-gel processing, mainly because of its contribution to the mixed dispersion and thermal effects. The zirconia nanoclusters thus formed were subsequently characterized by high-resolution electron microscopy to study the nanostructural morphology and transformation defects.},
doi = {10.1016/j.matchar.2004.01.007},
journal = {Materials Characterization},
number = 3,
volume = 52,
place = {United States},
year = 2004,
month = 6
}
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