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Title: Influence of coal based thermal power plants on aerosol optical properties in the Indo-Gangetic basin - article no. L05805

Abstract

The Indo-Gangetic basin is characterized by dense fog, haze and smog during the winter season. Here, we show one to one correspondence during the winter season of aerosol optical properties with the location of thermal power plants which are single small spatial entities compared to the big cities. Our results indicate that power plants are the key point source of air pollutants. The detailed analysis of aerosol parameters deduced from the Multiangle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) level 3 remote sensing data show the existence of absorbing and non-absorbing aerosols emitted from these plants. Analysis of higher resolution Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) level 2 aerosol optical depth over thermal power plants supports the findings.

Authors:
; ;  [1]
  1. Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur (India). Dept. of Civil Engineering
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20741139
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Geophysical Research Letters; Journal Volume: 33; Journal Issue: 5
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
01 COAL, LIGNITE, AND PEAT; FOSSIL-FUEL POWER PLANTS; AEROSOLS; EMISSION; STATIONARY POLLUTANT SOURCES; INDIA; OPTICAL PROPERTIES

Citation Formats

Prasad, A.K., Singh, R.P., and Kafatos, M.. Influence of coal based thermal power plants on aerosol optical properties in the Indo-Gangetic basin - article no. L05805. United States: N. p., 2006. Web.
Prasad, A.K., Singh, R.P., & Kafatos, M.. Influence of coal based thermal power plants on aerosol optical properties in the Indo-Gangetic basin - article no. L05805. United States.
Prasad, A.K., Singh, R.P., and Kafatos, M.. Tue . "Influence of coal based thermal power plants on aerosol optical properties in the Indo-Gangetic basin - article no. L05805". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_20741139,
title = {Influence of coal based thermal power plants on aerosol optical properties in the Indo-Gangetic basin - article no. L05805},
author = {Prasad, A.K. and Singh, R.P. and Kafatos, M.},
abstractNote = {The Indo-Gangetic basin is characterized by dense fog, haze and smog during the winter season. Here, we show one to one correspondence during the winter season of aerosol optical properties with the location of thermal power plants which are single small spatial entities compared to the big cities. Our results indicate that power plants are the key point source of air pollutants. The detailed analysis of aerosol parameters deduced from the Multiangle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) level 3 remote sensing data show the existence of absorbing and non-absorbing aerosols emitted from these plants. Analysis of higher resolution Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) level 2 aerosol optical depth over thermal power plants supports the findings.},
doi = {},
journal = {Geophysical Research Letters},
number = 5,
volume = 33,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Mar 07 00:00:00 EST 2006},
month = {Tue Mar 07 00:00:00 EST 2006}
}
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