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Title: Processing and properties of a lightweight fire resistant core material for sandwich structures

Abstract

A process for syntactic foam made from fly ash, a waste product of coal combustion from thermal power plants, has been developed using phenolic resin binders at low levels. The fly ash consists of hollow glass or ceramic microspheres and needs to be treated to remove contaminants. The production process is easily scalable and can be tailored to produce foams of desired properties for specific applications. Complex shaped parts also are possible with appropriate compression mold tooling. Mechanical properties, compression, tension, shear and fracture toughness, have been determined in this preliminary investigation on this syntactic material and are found to be comparable or better than commercially available core materials. Initial testing for fire resistance has indicated very encouraging results. Further work is being continued to develop this core material with superior mechanical and fire resistance properties.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ;  [1]
  1. North Carolina Agriculture & Technical State University, Greensboro, NC (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20741101
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Journal of Advanced Materials; Journal Volume: 38; Journal Issue: 1
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
01 COAL, LIGNITE, AND PEAT; WASTE PRODUCT UTILIZATION; FLY ASH; COAL; FOAMS; BINDERS; RESINS; MECHANICAL PROPERTIES; FIRE RESISTANCE

Citation Formats

Shivakumar, K.N., Argade, S.D., Sadler, R.L., Sharpe, M.M., Dunn, L., Swaminathan, G., and Sorathia, U.. Processing and properties of a lightweight fire resistant core material for sandwich structures. United States: N. p., 2006. Web.
Shivakumar, K.N., Argade, S.D., Sadler, R.L., Sharpe, M.M., Dunn, L., Swaminathan, G., & Sorathia, U.. Processing and properties of a lightweight fire resistant core material for sandwich structures. United States.
Shivakumar, K.N., Argade, S.D., Sadler, R.L., Sharpe, M.M., Dunn, L., Swaminathan, G., and Sorathia, U.. Sun . "Processing and properties of a lightweight fire resistant core material for sandwich structures". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_20741101,
title = {Processing and properties of a lightweight fire resistant core material for sandwich structures},
author = {Shivakumar, K.N. and Argade, S.D. and Sadler, R.L. and Sharpe, M.M. and Dunn, L. and Swaminathan, G. and Sorathia, U.},
abstractNote = {A process for syntactic foam made from fly ash, a waste product of coal combustion from thermal power plants, has been developed using phenolic resin binders at low levels. The fly ash consists of hollow glass or ceramic microspheres and needs to be treated to remove contaminants. The production process is easily scalable and can be tailored to produce foams of desired properties for specific applications. Complex shaped parts also are possible with appropriate compression mold tooling. Mechanical properties, compression, tension, shear and fracture toughness, have been determined in this preliminary investigation on this syntactic material and are found to be comparable or better than commercially available core materials. Initial testing for fire resistance has indicated very encouraging results. Further work is being continued to develop this core material with superior mechanical and fire resistance properties.},
doi = {},
journal = {Journal of Advanced Materials},
number = 1,
volume = 38,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Jan 15 00:00:00 EST 2006},
month = {Sun Jan 15 00:00:00 EST 2006}
}
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