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Title: Designing wet duct/stack systems for coal-fired plants

Abstract

A multitude of variables must be accounted for during the design and development of a wet-stack flue gas desulfurization system. The five-phase process detailed in this article has proven effective on more than 60 wet-stack system design studies. The process is the result of studies by EPRI detailed in two reports entitled: entrainment in wet stacks', and 'wet stacks design guide. A basic understanding of these concepts will help inform early design decisions and produce a system amenable to wet operation. 2 refs., 5 figs.

Authors:
;  [1]
  1. Alden Research Laboratory Inc. (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20741056
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Power (New York); Journal Volume: 150; Journal Issue: 1; Other Information: danderson@aldenlab.com
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
01 COAL, LIGNITE, AND PEAT; 20 FOSSIL-FUELED POWER PLANTS; COAL; FLUE GAS; DESULFURIZATION; AIR POLLUTION CONTROL; DESIGN; POLLUTION CONTROL EQUIPMENT; STACKS; PLUMES; INSTALLATION; FLOW MODELS; VAPOR CONDENSATION; COMPUTERIZED SIMULATION; LIQUID FLOW; ABSORPTION

Citation Formats

Anderson, D.K., and Maroti, L.A. Designing wet duct/stack systems for coal-fired plants. United States: N. p., 2006. Web.
Anderson, D.K., & Maroti, L.A. Designing wet duct/stack systems for coal-fired plants. United States.
Anderson, D.K., and Maroti, L.A. Wed . "Designing wet duct/stack systems for coal-fired plants". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_20741056,
title = {Designing wet duct/stack systems for coal-fired plants},
author = {Anderson, D.K. and Maroti, L.A.},
abstractNote = {A multitude of variables must be accounted for during the design and development of a wet-stack flue gas desulfurization system. The five-phase process detailed in this article has proven effective on more than 60 wet-stack system design studies. The process is the result of studies by EPRI detailed in two reports entitled: entrainment in wet stacks', and 'wet stacks design guide. A basic understanding of these concepts will help inform early design decisions and produce a system amenable to wet operation. 2 refs., 5 figs.},
doi = {},
journal = {Power (New York)},
number = 1,
volume = 150,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Mar 15 00:00:00 EST 2006},
month = {Wed Mar 15 00:00:00 EST 2006}
}
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