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Title: Small Fiber Z-Pinch As Tool For Studying Z-Pinch Physics

Abstract

Carbon fiber Z-pinch experiments have been performed in vacuum on a slow current generator (80 kA peak current, 850 ns quarter period). During the first 500 ns the discharge could be characterized as plasma-on-fiber. Short XUV pulses were emitted when coronal plasma reached a fiber. Each XUV pulse corresponded to the gradual fall of dI/dt and to the growth of voltage up to 10 kV. The reason for that is the rise of the term R+dL/dt up to 0.3 {omega}. After 500 ns the discharge occurred mainly in the vapor of electrodes. The soft and hard X-ray radiation was generated as soon as an m=0 instability developed. At that time the voltage peak of up to 30 kV was detected. Although a carbon fiber is of a modest interest now, we believe it could provide a valuable data for Z-pinch physics.

Authors:
; ;  [1]
  1. Czech Technical University, Faculty of Electrical Engineering, Department of Physics, Technicka 2, 166 27 Prague 6 (Czech Republic)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20729304
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: AIP Conference Proceedings; Journal Volume: 808; Journal Issue: 1; Conference: 6. international conference on dense Z-pinches, Oxford (United Kingdom), 25-28 Jul 2005; Other Information: DOI: 10.1063/1.2159328; (c) 2006 American Institute of Physics; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
70 PLASMA PHYSICS AND FUSION TECHNOLOGY; CARBON FIBERS; ELECTRIC CURRENTS; ELECTRODES; EXTREME ULTRAVIOLET RADIATION; HARD X RADIATION; PINCH EFFECT; PLASMA; PLASMA DIAGNOSTICS; PLASMA INSTABILITY; PULSES; VAPORS

Citation Formats

Klir, Daniel, Kravarik, Jozef, and Kubes, Pavel. Small Fiber Z-Pinch As Tool For Studying Z-Pinch Physics. United States: N. p., 2006. Web. doi:10.1063/1.2159328.
Klir, Daniel, Kravarik, Jozef, & Kubes, Pavel. Small Fiber Z-Pinch As Tool For Studying Z-Pinch Physics. United States. doi:10.1063/1.2159328.
Klir, Daniel, Kravarik, Jozef, and Kubes, Pavel. Thu . "Small Fiber Z-Pinch As Tool For Studying Z-Pinch Physics". United States. doi:10.1063/1.2159328.
@article{osti_20729304,
title = {Small Fiber Z-Pinch As Tool For Studying Z-Pinch Physics},
author = {Klir, Daniel and Kravarik, Jozef and Kubes, Pavel},
abstractNote = {Carbon fiber Z-pinch experiments have been performed in vacuum on a slow current generator (80 kA peak current, 850 ns quarter period). During the first 500 ns the discharge could be characterized as plasma-on-fiber. Short XUV pulses were emitted when coronal plasma reached a fiber. Each XUV pulse corresponded to the gradual fall of dI/dt and to the growth of voltage up to 10 kV. The reason for that is the rise of the term R+dL/dt up to 0.3 {omega}. After 500 ns the discharge occurred mainly in the vapor of electrodes. The soft and hard X-ray radiation was generated as soon as an m=0 instability developed. At that time the voltage peak of up to 30 kV was detected. Although a carbon fiber is of a modest interest now, we believe it could provide a valuable data for Z-pinch physics.},
doi = {10.1063/1.2159328},
journal = {AIP Conference Proceedings},
number = 1,
volume = 808,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Jan 05 00:00:00 EST 2006},
month = {Thu Jan 05 00:00:00 EST 2006}
}
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  • Abstract not provided.
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