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Title: Ion Viscous Heating and the Destruction of Magnetic Flux

Abstract

Further work on ion heating through viscous dissipation of vorticity generated by short wavelength m=0 instabilities is reported. Both heavy tungsten wire arrays and light stainless steel arrays are considered, the latter leading to record ion temperatures in the 200-300keV range. The problem of magnetic flux destruction is addressed, and this is solved by a reversible mechanism involving axially asymmetric m=0 hot spots on the axis.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College, London (United Kingdom)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20729285
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: AIP Conference Proceedings; Journal Volume: 808; Journal Issue: 1; Conference: 6. international conference on dense Z-pinches, Oxford (United Kingdom), 25-28 Jul 2005; Other Information: DOI: 10.1063/1.2159386; (c) 2006 American Institute of Physics; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
70 PLASMA PHYSICS AND FUSION TECHNOLOGY; ASYMMETRY; EXPLODING WIRES; HOT SPOTS; ION TEMPERATURE; IONS; LONGITUDINAL PINCH; MAGNETIC FLUX; PLASMA HEATING; PLASMA INSTABILITY; STAINLESS STEELS; TUNGSTEN; WAVELENGTHS

Citation Formats

Haines, M.G. Ion Viscous Heating and the Destruction of Magnetic Flux. United States: N. p., 2006. Web. doi:10.1063/1.2159386.
Haines, M.G. Ion Viscous Heating and the Destruction of Magnetic Flux. United States. doi:10.1063/1.2159386.
Haines, M.G. Thu . "Ion Viscous Heating and the Destruction of Magnetic Flux". United States. doi:10.1063/1.2159386.
@article{osti_20729285,
title = {Ion Viscous Heating and the Destruction of Magnetic Flux},
author = {Haines, M.G.},
abstractNote = {Further work on ion heating through viscous dissipation of vorticity generated by short wavelength m=0 instabilities is reported. Both heavy tungsten wire arrays and light stainless steel arrays are considered, the latter leading to record ion temperatures in the 200-300keV range. The problem of magnetic flux destruction is addressed, and this is solved by a reversible mechanism involving axially asymmetric m=0 hot spots on the axis.},
doi = {10.1063/1.2159386},
journal = {AIP Conference Proceedings},
number = 1,
volume = 808,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Jan 05 00:00:00 EST 2006},
month = {Thu Jan 05 00:00:00 EST 2006}
}
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