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Title: E-WIMPs

Abstract

Extremely weakly interacting massive particles (E-WIMPs) are intriguing candidates for cold dark matter in the Universe. We review two well motivated E-WIMPs, an axino and a gravitino, and point out their cosmological and phenomenological similarities and differences, the latter of which may allow one to distinguishing them in LHC searches for supersymmetry.

Authors:
;  [1]
  1. Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Sheffield, Sheffield, S3 7RH (United Kingdom)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20729179
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: AIP Conference Proceedings; Journal Volume: 805; Journal Issue: 1; Conference: PASCOS 2005: 11. international symposium on particles, strings, and cosmology, Gyeongju (Korea, Republic of), 30 May - 4 Jun 2005; Other Information: DOI: 10.1063/1.2149672; (c) 2005 American Institute of Physics; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
72 PHYSICS OF ELEMENTARY PARTICLES AND FIELDS; CERN LHC; COSMOLOGY; NONLUMINOUS MATTER; QUANTUM FIELD THEORY; REVIEWS; SPARTICLES; SUPERSYMMETRY; UNIVERSE

Citation Formats

Choi, Ki-Young, and Roszkowski, Leszek. E-WIMPs. United States: N. p., 2005. Web. doi:10.1063/1.2149672.
Choi, Ki-Young, & Roszkowski, Leszek. E-WIMPs. United States. doi:10.1063/1.2149672.
Choi, Ki-Young, and Roszkowski, Leszek. Fri . "E-WIMPs". United States. doi:10.1063/1.2149672.
@article{osti_20729179,
title = {E-WIMPs},
author = {Choi, Ki-Young and Roszkowski, Leszek},
abstractNote = {Extremely weakly interacting massive particles (E-WIMPs) are intriguing candidates for cold dark matter in the Universe. We review two well motivated E-WIMPs, an axino and a gravitino, and point out their cosmological and phenomenological similarities and differences, the latter of which may allow one to distinguishing them in LHC searches for supersymmetry.},
doi = {10.1063/1.2149672},
journal = {AIP Conference Proceedings},
number = 1,
volume = 805,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Dec 02 00:00:00 EST 2005},
month = {Fri Dec 02 00:00:00 EST 2005}
}
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