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Title: Target motion measurement without implanted markers and its validation by comparison with manually obtained data

Abstract

For an effective radiotherapy the exact tumor location must be determined. The localization has to take into account patient's setup position as well as internal organ motion. Among the different localization methods, the use of a computer tomography (CT) scanner in the therapy room has been proposed recently. Achieving a CT with the patient on the therapy couch, a patient's treatment position is captured. We present a method to locate tumor considering internal organ motion and displacements due to respiration. We tested the method with prostate and lung patients. The method found the most probable tumor position as well as, for high-mobility tumors located in the lung, its trajectory during the respiratory cycle. The results of this novel method were validated by comparison with manually determined target position.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ;  [1];  [2]
  1. Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Strahlentherapie, Universitaet Wuerzburg, Josef-Schneider-Str. 11, 97080 Wuerzburg (Germany)
  2. (Germany)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20726907
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Physics; Journal Volume: 32; Journal Issue: 11; Other Information: DOI: 10.1118/1.2103447; (c) 2005 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; CARCINOMAS; COMPUTERIZED TOMOGRAPHY; LUNGS; PATIENTS; PROSTATE; RADIOTHERAPY; RESPIRATION; VALIDATION

Citation Formats

Vences, Lucia, Wulf, Joern, Vordermark, Dirk, Sauer, Otto, Berlinger, Kajetan, Roth, Michael, and Lehrstuhl fuer Informatik IX, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Boltzmannstr. 3, 85748 Garching. Target motion measurement without implanted markers and its validation by comparison with manually obtained data. United States: N. p., 2005. Web. doi:10.1118/1.2103447.
Vences, Lucia, Wulf, Joern, Vordermark, Dirk, Sauer, Otto, Berlinger, Kajetan, Roth, Michael, & Lehrstuhl fuer Informatik IX, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Boltzmannstr. 3, 85748 Garching. Target motion measurement without implanted markers and its validation by comparison with manually obtained data. United States. doi:10.1118/1.2103447.
Vences, Lucia, Wulf, Joern, Vordermark, Dirk, Sauer, Otto, Berlinger, Kajetan, Roth, Michael, and Lehrstuhl fuer Informatik IX, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Boltzmannstr. 3, 85748 Garching. Tue . "Target motion measurement without implanted markers and its validation by comparison with manually obtained data". United States. doi:10.1118/1.2103447.
@article{osti_20726907,
title = {Target motion measurement without implanted markers and its validation by comparison with manually obtained data},
author = {Vences, Lucia and Wulf, Joern and Vordermark, Dirk and Sauer, Otto and Berlinger, Kajetan and Roth, Michael and Lehrstuhl fuer Informatik IX, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Boltzmannstr. 3, 85748 Garching},
abstractNote = {For an effective radiotherapy the exact tumor location must be determined. The localization has to take into account patient's setup position as well as internal organ motion. Among the different localization methods, the use of a computer tomography (CT) scanner in the therapy room has been proposed recently. Achieving a CT with the patient on the therapy couch, a patient's treatment position is captured. We present a method to locate tumor considering internal organ motion and displacements due to respiration. We tested the method with prostate and lung patients. The method found the most probable tumor position as well as, for high-mobility tumors located in the lung, its trajectory during the respiratory cycle. The results of this novel method were validated by comparison with manually determined target position.},
doi = {10.1118/1.2103447},
journal = {Medical Physics},
number = 11,
volume = 32,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Nov 15 00:00:00 EST 2005},
month = {Tue Nov 15 00:00:00 EST 2005}
}
  • Purpose: To estimate the prevalence of rectal and urinary dysfunctional symptoms using image guided radiation therapy (IGRT) with fiducials and magnetic resonance planning for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: During the implementation stages of IGRT between September 2008 and March 2010, 367 consecutive patients were treated with prostatic irradiation using 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy with and without IGRT (non-IGRT). In November 2010, these men were asked to report their bowel and bladder symptoms using a postal questionnaire. The proportions of patients with moderate to severe symptoms in these groups were compared using logistic regression models adjusted for tumor and treatmentmore » characteristic variables. Results: Of the 282 respondents, the 154 selected for IGRT had higher stage tumors, received higher prescribed doses, and had larger volumes of rectum receiving high dosage than did the 128 selected for non-IGRT. The follow-up duration was 8 to 26 months. Compared with the non-IGRT group, improvement was noted in all dysfunctional rectal symptoms using IGRT. In multivariable analyses, IGRT improved rectal pain (odds ratio [OR] 0.07 [0.009-0.7], P=.02), urgency (OR 0.27 [0.11-0.63], P=<.01), diarrhea (OR 0.009 [0.02-0.35], P<.01), and change in bowel habits (OR 0.18 [0.06-0.52], P<.010). No correlation was observed between rectal symptom levels and dose-volume histogram data. Urinary dysfunctional symptoms were similar in both treatment groups. Conclusions: In comparison with men selected for non-IGRT, a significant reduction of bowel dysfunctional symptoms was confirmed in men selected for IGRT, even though they had larger volumes of rectum treated to higher doses.« less
  • Purpose: To develop a markerless tracking algorithm to track the tumor boundary in megavoltage (MV)-electronic portal imaging device (EPID) images for image-guided radiation therapy. Methods: A level set method (LSM)-based algorithm is developed to track tumor boundary in EPID image sequences. Given an EPID image sequence, an initial curve is manually specified in the first frame. Driven by a region-scalable energy fitting function, the initial curve automatically evolves toward the tumor boundary and stops on the desired boundary while the energy function reaches its minimum. For the subsequent frames, the tracking algorithm updates the initial curve by using the trackingmore » result in the previous frame and reuses the LSM to detect the tumor boundary in the subsequent frame so that the tracking processing can be continued without user intervention. The tracking algorithm is tested on three image datasets, including a 4-D phantom EPID image sequence, four digitally deformable phantom image sequences with different noise levels, and four clinical EPID image sequences acquired in lung cancer treatment. The tracking accuracy is evaluated based on two metrics: centroid localization error (CLE) and volume overlap index (VOI) between the tracking result and the ground truth. Results: For the 4-D phantom image sequence, the CLE is 0.23 ± 0.20 mm, and VOI is 95.6% ± 0.2%. For the digital phantom image sequences, the total CLE and VOI are 0.11 ± 0.08 mm and 96.7% ± 0.7%, respectively. In addition, for the clinical EPID image sequences, the proposed algorithm achieves 0.32 ± 0.77 mm in the CLE and 72.1% ± 5.5% in the VOI. These results demonstrate the effectiveness of the authors’ proposed method both in tumor localization and boundary tracking in EPID images. In addition, compared with two existing tracking algorithms, the proposed method achieves a higher accuracy in tumor localization. Conclusions: In this paper, the authors presented a feasibility study of tracking tumor boundary in EPID images by using a LSM-based algorithm. Experimental results conducted on phantom and clinical EPID images demonstrated the effectiveness of the tracking algorithm for visible tumor target. Compared with previous tracking methods, the authors’ algorithm has the potential to improve the tracking accuracy in radiation therapy. In addition, real-time tumor boundary information within the irradiation field will be potentially useful for further applications, such as adaptive beam delivery, dose evaluation.« less
  • Purpose: To determine target volume changes by using volume and shape analysis for patients receiving radiotherapy after breast conservation surgery and to compare different methods of automatically identifying changes in target volume, position, size, and shape during radiotherapy for use in adaptive radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Eleven patients undergoing whole breast radiotherapy had fiducial markers sutured into the excision cavity at the time of surgery. Patients underwent imaging using computed tomography (for planning and at the end of treatment) and during treatment by using portal imaging. A marker volume (MV) was defined by using the measured marker positions. Changes inmore » both individual marker positions and MVs were identified manually and using six automated similarity indices. Comparison of the two types of analysis (manual and automated) was undertaken to establish whether similarity indices can be used to automatically detect changes in target volumes. Results: Manual analysis showed that 3 patients had significant MV reduction. This analysis also showed significant changes between planning computed tomography and the start of treatment for 9 patients, including single and multiple marker movement, deformation (shape change), and rotation. Four of the six similarity indices were shown to be sensitive to the observed changes. Conclusions: Significant changes in size, shape, and position occur to the fiducial marker-defined volume. Four similarity indices can be used to identify these changes, and a protocol for their use in adaptive radiotherapy is suggested.« less
  • Purpose: To evaluate the impact of the number and location of intraprostatic fiducial markers on the accuracy and reproducibility of daily prostate target alignment and to evaluate the migration of such markers. Methods and Materials: Three gold fiducial markers were implanted transrectally under ultrasound guidance near the apex, middle, and base of the prostate in 10 prostate cancer patients. The patients had pretreatment in-room computed tomography (CT) scans three times a week, for approximately 25 CT scans per patient during the 8-week treatment course. A total of 1280 alignments were performed using different alignment scenarios: whole-prostate soft tissue alignment (themore » gold standard), bone alignment, and seven permutations of alignments using one, two, or three fiducial markers. The results of bone alignment and fiducial alignment were compared with the results of whole-prostate alignment. Fiducial migration was also evaluated. Results: Single-fiducial-marker alignment was more accurate and reproducible than bone alignment. However, due to organ deformation, single fiducial markers did not always reliably represent the position of the entire prostate. The use of two-fiducial combinations was more accurate and reproducible than single-fiducial alignment, and use of all three fiducials was the best. Use of an apex fiducial together with a base fiducial rivaled the use of all three fiducials markers together. Fiducial migration was minimal. Conclusions: The number and the location of implanted fiducial markers affect the accuracy and reliability of daily prostate target alignment. The use of two or more fiducial markers is recommended.« less
  • Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy of the No Action Level (NAL) off-line correction protocol in the reduction of systematic prostate displacements as determined from electronic portal images (EPI) using implanted markers. Methods and materials: Four platinum markers, two near the apex and two near the base of the prostate, were implanted for localization purposes in patients who received fractionated high dose rate brachytherapy. During the following course of 25 fractions of external beam radiotherapy, the position of each marker relative to the corresponding position in digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs) was measured in EPI in 15 patients for on average 17more » fractions per patient. These marker positions yield the composite displacements due to both setup error and internal prostate motion, relative to the planning computed tomography scan. As the NAL protocol is highly effective in reducing systematic errors (recurring each fraction) due to setup inaccuracy alone, we investigated its efficacy in reducing systematic composite displacements. The analysis was performed for the center of mass (COM) of the four markers, as well as for the cranial and caudal markers separately. Furthermore, the impact of prostate rotation on the achieved positioning accuracy was determined. Results: In case of no setup corrections, the standard deviations of the systematic composite displacements of the COM were 3-4 mm in the craniocaudal and anterior-posterior directions, and 2 mm in the left-right direction. The corresponding SDs of the random displacements (interfraction fluctuations) were 2-3 mm in each direction. When applying a NAL protocol based on three initial treatment fractions, the SDs of the systematic COM displacements were reduced to 1-2 mm. Displacements at the cranial end of the prostate were slightly larger than at the caudal end, and quantitative analysis showed this originates from left-right axis rotations about the prostate apex. Further analysis revealed that significant time trends are present in these prostate rotations. No significant trends were observed for the prostate translations. Conclusions: The NAL protocol based on marker positions in EPI halved the composite systematic displacements using only three imaged fractions per patient, and thus allowed for a significant reduction of planning margins. Although large rotations of the prostate, and time trends therein, were observed, the net impact on the measured displacements and on the accuracy obtained with NAL was small.« less