skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Synthesis and Deposition of Nanoparticles Using a Hypersonically Expanded Plasma

Abstract

Si-Ti-N nanostructured coatings were synthesized by inertial impaction of nanoparticles using a process called hypersonic plasma particle deposition (HPPD). Transmission electron microscopy on samples prepared by focused ion beam (FIB) milling show TiN nanocrystallites in an amorphous matrix. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy results indicate the presence of amorphous Si3N4 in similar films. In-situ particle size distribution measurements show that particle size distributions peak around 14 nm under typical operating conditions.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ;  [1]
  1. Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Minnesota, 111 Church Street SE, Minneapolis, MN (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20726830
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: AIP Conference Proceedings; Journal Volume: 799; Journal Issue: 1; Conference: 4. international conference on the physics of dusty plasmas, Orleans (France), 13-17 Jun 2005; Other Information: DOI: 10.1063/1.2134678; (c) 2005 American Institute of Physics; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
70 PLASMA PHYSICS AND FUSION TECHNOLOGY; COATINGS; DEPOSITION; DISTRIBUTION; FILMS; ION BEAMS; MILLING; NANOSTRUCTURES; PARTICLE SIZE; PARTICLES; PLASMA; SYNTHESIS; TITANIUM NITRIDES; TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY; ULTRASONIC WAVES; X-RAY PHOTOELECTRON SPECTROSCOPY

Citation Formats

Hafiz, Jami, Wang Xiaoliang, Mukherjee, Rajesh, McMurry, Peter H., Heberlein, Joachim V.R., and Girshick, Steven L.. Synthesis and Deposition of Nanoparticles Using a Hypersonically Expanded Plasma. United States: N. p., 2005. Web. doi:10.1063/1.2134678.
Hafiz, Jami, Wang Xiaoliang, Mukherjee, Rajesh, McMurry, Peter H., Heberlein, Joachim V.R., & Girshick, Steven L.. Synthesis and Deposition of Nanoparticles Using a Hypersonically Expanded Plasma. United States. doi:10.1063/1.2134678.
Hafiz, Jami, Wang Xiaoliang, Mukherjee, Rajesh, McMurry, Peter H., Heberlein, Joachim V.R., and Girshick, Steven L.. Mon . "Synthesis and Deposition of Nanoparticles Using a Hypersonically Expanded Plasma". United States. doi:10.1063/1.2134678.
@article{osti_20726830,
title = {Synthesis and Deposition of Nanoparticles Using a Hypersonically Expanded Plasma},
author = {Hafiz, Jami and Wang Xiaoliang and Mukherjee, Rajesh and McMurry, Peter H. and Heberlein, Joachim V.R. and Girshick, Steven L.},
abstractNote = {Si-Ti-N nanostructured coatings were synthesized by inertial impaction of nanoparticles using a process called hypersonic plasma particle deposition (HPPD). Transmission electron microscopy on samples prepared by focused ion beam (FIB) milling show TiN nanocrystallites in an amorphous matrix. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy results indicate the presence of amorphous Si3N4 in similar films. In-situ particle size distribution measurements show that particle size distributions peak around 14 nm under typical operating conditions.},
doi = {10.1063/1.2134678},
journal = {AIP Conference Proceedings},
number = 1,
volume = 799,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Oct 31 00:00:00 EST 2005},
month = {Mon Oct 31 00:00:00 EST 2005}
}
  • This paper for the first time reports the (200) oriented growth of hexagonal Aluminum nitride crystals during synthesis of aluminum nanoparticles in dc transferred arc thermal plasma reactor by gas phase condensation in nitrogen plasma. The structural and morphological study of as synthesized AlN crystal and aluminium nanoparticles was done by using the x-ray diffraction method, scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy.
  • Ordered assemblies of nanoparticles remain challenging to fabricate, yet could open the door to many potential applications of nanomaterials. Here, we demonstrate that locally ordered arrays of nanoparticles, using electrophoretic deposition, can be extended to produce long-range order among the constituents. Voronoi tessellations along with multiple statistical analyses show dramatic increases in order compared with previously reported assemblies formed through electric field-assisted assembly. As a result, based on subsequent physical measurements of the nanoparticles and the deposition system, the underlying mechanisms that generate increased order are inferred.
  • Detailed methodology and results are presented for a two-dimensional (r,z) computer model applicable to dc arc jet reactors operating on argon/hydrogen/hydrocarbon gas mixtures and used for chemical vapor deposition of micro- and nanocrystalline diamond and diamondlike carbon films. The model incorporates gas activation, expansion into the low pressure reactor chamber, and the chemistry of the neutral and charged species. It predicts the spatial variation of temperature, flow velocities and number densities of 25 neutral and 14 charged species, and the dependence of these parameters on the operating conditions of the reactor such as flows of H{sub 2} and CH{sub 4}more » and input power. Selected outcomes of the model are compared with experimental data in the accompanying paper [C. J. Rennick et al., J. Appl. Phys. 102, 063309 (2007)]. Two-dimensional spatial maps of the number densities of key radical and molecular species in the reactor, derived from the model, provide a summary of the complicated chemical processing that occurs. In the vortex region beyond the plume, the key transformations are CH{sub 4}{yields}CH{sub 3}{r_reversible}C{sub 2}H{sub 2}{r_reversible}large hydrocarbons; in the plume or the transition zone to the cooler regions, the chemical processing involves C{sub 2}H{sub x}{r_reversible}(CH{sub y} and CH{sub z}), C{sub 3}H{sub x}{r_reversible}(CH{sub y} and C{sub 2}H{sub z}), (C{sub 2}H{sub y} and C{sub 2}H{sub z}){r_reversible}C{sub 4}H{sub x}{r_reversible}(CH{sub y} and C{sub 3}H{sub z}). Depending on the local gas temperature T{sub g} and the H/H{sub 2} ratio, the equilibria of H-shifting reactions favor C, CH, and C{sub 2} species (in the hot, H-rich axial region of the plume) or CH{sub 2}, C{sub 2}H, and C{sub 2}H{sub 2} species (at the outer boundary of the transition zone). Deductions are drawn about the most abundant C-containing radical species incident on the growing diamond surface (C atoms and CH radicals) within this reactor, and the importance of chemistry involving charged species is discussed. Modifications to the boundary conditions and model reactor geometry allow its application to a lower power arc jet reactor operated and extensively studied by Jeffries and co-workers at SRI International, and comparisons are drawn with the reported laser induced fluorescence data from these studies.« less