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Title: Irradiation system of ions (H-Xe) for biological studies near the Bragg peak

Abstract

We have developed a new system for irradiating biological samples in air with ions from H to Xe below 6.0 MeV/nucleon near the Bragg peak. The irradiation system can provide ion beams with 20-mm diameter of which the central area of 100 mm{sup 2} is uniform in fluence rate within a standard deviation of {+-}10%. For each ion, the linear energy transfer is selectable by irradiation positions in air, from the lowest at the surface of a vacuum window to the highest at the Bragg peak, for example, from 281 to 977 keV/{mu}m for C ions. A wide range of fluence rates, 10{sup -3}-10{sup 4} ions/{mu}m{sup 2}/s, can be provided by the system, which makes it possible to irradiate a variety of biological samples with different target sizes, from small plasmid DNA to living mammalian cells. The ion fluence irradiated to each sample is calculated from the output of the secondary electron monitor using the linear relationship between the output and ion fluence measured at the sample position by CR-39 track detectors. Survival curves and visualization of NBS1 foci for human cells are presented as examples of preliminary experiments using C ions near the Bragg peak.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;  [1];  [2];  [2];  [2];  [2];  [2]
  1. Department of Life Science, Rikkyo University, 3-34-1 Nishi-Ikebukuro, Toshima-ku, Tokyo 171-8501 (Japan)
  2. (Japan)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20723254
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Review of Scientific Instruments; Journal Volume: 76; Journal Issue: 11; Other Information: DOI: 10.1063/1.2134408; (c) 2005 American Institute of Physics; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
46 INSTRUMENTATION RELATED TO NUCLEAR SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY; AIR; ANIMAL CELLS; BRAGG CURVE; CARBON IONS; DNA; ELECTRONS; ION BEAMS; IRRADIATION; KEV RANGE 100-1000; LET; MEV RANGE 01-10; MONITORS; RADIOTHERAPY; SURVIVAL CURVES

Citation Formats

Konishi, Teruaki, Yasuda, Nakahiro, Takeyasu, Akihiro, Ishizawa, Sachi, Fujisaki, Takashi, Matsumoto, Kenichi, Furusawa, Yoshiya, Sato, Yukio, Hieda, Kotaro, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555, Department of Life Science, Rikkyo University, 3-34-1 Nishi-Ikebukuro, Toshima-ku, Tokyo 171-8501, Department of Physics, Toho University, 2-2-1 Miyama, Funabashi, Chiba 274-8510, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555, and Department of Life Science, Rikkyo University, 3-34-1 Nishi-Ikebukuro, Toshima-ku, Tokyo 171-8501. Irradiation system of ions (H-Xe) for biological studies near the Bragg peak. United States: N. p., 2005. Web. doi:10.1063/1.2134408.
Konishi, Teruaki, Yasuda, Nakahiro, Takeyasu, Akihiro, Ishizawa, Sachi, Fujisaki, Takashi, Matsumoto, Kenichi, Furusawa, Yoshiya, Sato, Yukio, Hieda, Kotaro, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555, Department of Life Science, Rikkyo University, 3-34-1 Nishi-Ikebukuro, Toshima-ku, Tokyo 171-8501, Department of Physics, Toho University, 2-2-1 Miyama, Funabashi, Chiba 274-8510, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555, & Department of Life Science, Rikkyo University, 3-34-1 Nishi-Ikebukuro, Toshima-ku, Tokyo 171-8501. Irradiation system of ions (H-Xe) for biological studies near the Bragg peak. United States. doi:10.1063/1.2134408.
Konishi, Teruaki, Yasuda, Nakahiro, Takeyasu, Akihiro, Ishizawa, Sachi, Fujisaki, Takashi, Matsumoto, Kenichi, Furusawa, Yoshiya, Sato, Yukio, Hieda, Kotaro, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555, Department of Life Science, Rikkyo University, 3-34-1 Nishi-Ikebukuro, Toshima-ku, Tokyo 171-8501, Department of Physics, Toho University, 2-2-1 Miyama, Funabashi, Chiba 274-8510, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555, and Department of Life Science, Rikkyo University, 3-34-1 Nishi-Ikebukuro, Toshima-ku, Tokyo 171-8501. Tue . "Irradiation system of ions (H-Xe) for biological studies near the Bragg peak". United States. doi:10.1063/1.2134408.
@article{osti_20723254,
title = {Irradiation system of ions (H-Xe) for biological studies near the Bragg peak},
author = {Konishi, Teruaki and Yasuda, Nakahiro and Takeyasu, Akihiro and Ishizawa, Sachi and Fujisaki, Takashi and Matsumoto, Kenichi and Furusawa, Yoshiya and Sato, Yukio and Hieda, Kotaro and National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 and Department of Life Science, Rikkyo University, 3-34-1 Nishi-Ikebukuro, Toshima-ku, Tokyo 171-8501 and Department of Physics, Toho University, 2-2-1 Miyama, Funabashi, Chiba 274-8510 and National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 and Department of Life Science, Rikkyo University, 3-34-1 Nishi-Ikebukuro, Toshima-ku, Tokyo 171-8501},
abstractNote = {We have developed a new system for irradiating biological samples in air with ions from H to Xe below 6.0 MeV/nucleon near the Bragg peak. The irradiation system can provide ion beams with 20-mm diameter of which the central area of 100 mm{sup 2} is uniform in fluence rate within a standard deviation of {+-}10%. For each ion, the linear energy transfer is selectable by irradiation positions in air, from the lowest at the surface of a vacuum window to the highest at the Bragg peak, for example, from 281 to 977 keV/{mu}m for C ions. A wide range of fluence rates, 10{sup -3}-10{sup 4} ions/{mu}m{sup 2}/s, can be provided by the system, which makes it possible to irradiate a variety of biological samples with different target sizes, from small plasmid DNA to living mammalian cells. The ion fluence irradiated to each sample is calculated from the output of the secondary electron monitor using the linear relationship between the output and ion fluence measured at the sample position by CR-39 track detectors. Survival curves and visualization of NBS1 foci for human cells are presented as examples of preliminary experiments using C ions near the Bragg peak.},
doi = {10.1063/1.2134408},
journal = {Review of Scientific Instruments},
number = 11,
volume = 76,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Nov 15 00:00:00 EST 2005},
month = {Tue Nov 15 00:00:00 EST 2005}
}
  • Recovery from sublethal damage of jejunal crypt cells was measured after fractionated irradiation with /sup 137/Cs, or accelerated helium ions, carbon ions, and neon ions. Cells irradiated with the accelerated particles showed less recovery than cells irradiated with /sup 137/Cs. For each accelerated heavy ion, cells irradiated in the peak region of the beam showed less recovery than cells irradiated in the plateau region. This resulted in an enhanced peak-to-plateau relative biological effectiveness (RBE) ratio which augments the already favorable physical depth-dose distribution for these beams.
  • Ions with charge states as high as 80+, produced in the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory electron beam ion trap were extracted and transferred to a Penning ion trap (RETRAP). RETRAP was operated at cryogenic temperature in the field of a superconducting magnet. The stored low-energy ions collided occasionally with H{sub 2} molecules in the ultrahigh-vacuum environment of the trap, capturing one or two electrons and reducing the charge state of the ions. The number of ions was monitored nondestructively by ramping the axial oscillation frequencies of the ions through resonance with a tuned circuit composed in part of trap capacitancemore » and an external inductor. This produced resonance signals whose square is proportional to the number of ions in each charge state. These signals were recorded vs storage time to determine the electron-capture rates. From these rates the relative electron-capture cross sections were obtained using estimates of the mean ion energies based on modeling the ion storage, and with the aid of a density calibration measurement using Ar{sup 11+}. The measured total electron-capture cross sections are consistent with a linear increase with charge state q. The cross-section data for the highest charge states lie above the predictions of the absorbing sphere model, but agree within uncertainties in both experiment and theory. The true double-capture cross-section fraction for q{gt}35 is near 25{percent}. The results are discussed with relation to measurements on lower charge states, and with theory. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}« less
  • Recoil ions from very small impact-parameter collisions of 20--70-keV protons with xenon atoms were selected by viewing only those ejected at 50{degree} and 70{degree} from the beam direction. These ions were charge-state analyzed and the cross sections determined for the production of charge states up to 6+. In such collisions, multiple ionization accounts for 60--80 % of the ionizing collisions and 80--90 % of the total ionization.
  • The dose distribution of carbon ion beams was modified to cover 14 cm peak width using a ridge filter suitable for clinical application. The results of cell survival as a function of depth of penetration of carbon ions and the mouse skin (foot) response at the proximal-, mid-, and distal-peak positions using four daily fractions are reported. The objective of these studies is to verify whether the dose distribution in the peak region is properly compensated to produce uniform biological effect. The implications of the shape of the dose distribution in the peak region to radiotherapy application are discussed.
  • Purpose: To quantify the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of the distal edge of the proton Bragg peak, using an in vitro assay of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). Methods and Materials: U2OS cells were irradiated within the plateau of a spread-out Bragg peak and at each millimeter position along the distal edge using a custom slide holder, allowing for simultaneous measurement of physical dose. A reference radiation signal was generated using photons. The DNA DSBs at 3 hours (to assess for early damage) and at 24 hours (to assess for residual damage and repair) after irradiation were measured using the γH2AX assay and quantifiedmore » via flow cytometry. Results were confirmed with clonogenic survival assays. A detailed map of the RBE as a function of depth along the Bragg peak was generated using γH2AX measurements as a biological endpoint. Results: At 3 hours after irradiation, DNA DSBs were higher with protons at every point along the distal edge compared with samples irradiated with photons to similar doses. This effect was even more pronounced after 24 hours, indicating that the impact of DNA repair is less after proton irradiation relative to photons. The RBE demonstrated an exponential increase as a function of depth and was measured to be as high as 4.0 after 3 hours and as high as 6.0 after 24 hours. When the RBE-corrected dose was plotted as a function of depth, the peak effective dose was extended 2-3 mm beyond what would be expected with physical measurement. Conclusions: We generated a highly comprehensive map of the RBE of the distal edge of the Bragg peak, using a direct assay of DNA DSBs in vitro. Our data show that the RBE of the distal edge increases with depth and is significantly higher than previously reported estimates.« less