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Title: Characteristics of a low-frequency-driven ferroinductor-coupled discharge

Abstract

We present characteristics of a low-frequency (LF) inductively coupled discharge where, instead of using an inductorlike rf antenna, we used a ferromagnetic core with a primary winding (''ferroinductor''). A dense (>10{sup 12} cm{sup -3}), highly ionized (30%-40%) plasma was obtained in this ferroinductor at gas pressures as low as 10{sup -4} Torr. In a wide range of comparatively low frequencies the core and winding losses were found to be small compared with the LF driving power delivered to the plasma. The driving frequency could be very low compared with typical inductively coupled discharges. The input impedance was found to be almost purely active (cos {phi}{approx_equal}0.9), and it was possible to achieve various input resistances (e.g., 50 {omega}) in the whole investigated range of frequencies, powers, and pressures, which made unnecessary any matching box between the LF driver and the ferroinductor-coupled plasma device. Such a combination of properties makes this kind of discharge attractive for many applications.

Authors:
; ;  [1]
  1. Department of Physics, Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa 32000 (Israel)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20719653
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Journal of Applied Physics; Journal Volume: 98; Journal Issue: 9; Other Information: DOI: 10.1063/1.2128474; (c) 2005 American Institute of Physics; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; ANTENNAS; ELECTRIC DISCHARGES; IMPEDANCE; IONIZATION; PLASMA

Citation Formats

Felsteiner, J., Slutsker, Ya.Z., and Vaisberg, P.M.. Characteristics of a low-frequency-driven ferroinductor-coupled discharge. United States: N. p., 2005. Web. doi:10.1063/1.2128474.
Felsteiner, J., Slutsker, Ya.Z., & Vaisberg, P.M.. Characteristics of a low-frequency-driven ferroinductor-coupled discharge. United States. doi:10.1063/1.2128474.
Felsteiner, J., Slutsker, Ya.Z., and Vaisberg, P.M.. Tue . "Characteristics of a low-frequency-driven ferroinductor-coupled discharge". United States. doi:10.1063/1.2128474.
@article{osti_20719653,
title = {Characteristics of a low-frequency-driven ferroinductor-coupled discharge},
author = {Felsteiner, J. and Slutsker, Ya.Z. and Vaisberg, P.M.},
abstractNote = {We present characteristics of a low-frequency (LF) inductively coupled discharge where, instead of using an inductorlike rf antenna, we used a ferromagnetic core with a primary winding (''ferroinductor''). A dense (>10{sup 12} cm{sup -3}), highly ionized (30%-40%) plasma was obtained in this ferroinductor at gas pressures as low as 10{sup -4} Torr. In a wide range of comparatively low frequencies the core and winding losses were found to be small compared with the LF driving power delivered to the plasma. The driving frequency could be very low compared with typical inductively coupled discharges. The input impedance was found to be almost purely active (cos {phi}{approx_equal}0.9), and it was possible to achieve various input resistances (e.g., 50 {omega}) in the whole investigated range of frequencies, powers, and pressures, which made unnecessary any matching box between the LF driver and the ferroinductor-coupled plasma device. Such a combination of properties makes this kind of discharge attractive for many applications.},
doi = {10.1063/1.2128474},
journal = {Journal of Applied Physics},
number = 9,
volume = 98,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Nov 01 00:00:00 EST 2005},
month = {Tue Nov 01 00:00:00 EST 2005}
}
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