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Title: Heavy-ion stopping in solids: Energy transfer to the target or the dragging force due to the induced potential wake

Abstract

There are two different approaches for describing the slowing down of charged particles in solids, commonly used in a separate way. Either one treats the energy transfer to the target or considers the dragging force due to the induced potential ('wake'). We herewith present a classical many-body calculation which intrinsically allows simultaneously both descriptions. For the first time, we can follow in detail the development of the stopping power, the projectile's charge and excitation state, as well as the formation of the wake, for ions entering into a solid. We further show that in nonequilibrium, stopping the development of the wake contributes much stronger to the change in stopping power than one could expect from the corresponding change of the projectile's charge or excitation state. This is exemplified by the explanation of an experimentally observed surface enhancement in the stopping power, which sheds new light on analysis tools with single atomic depth resolution. We underline our findings by simulating also anti-Ni ions, which are found to form a pressure wave in contrast to trailing wakes in the case of Ni ions.

Authors:
;  [1]
  1. Department fuer Physik, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen, Am Coulombwall 6, D-85748 Garching (Germany)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20718241
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Physical Review. A
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 72; Journal Issue: 2; Other Information: DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevA.72.024902; (c) 2005 The American Physical Society; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA); Journal ID: ISSN 1050-2947
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
74 ATOMIC AND MOLECULAR PHYSICS; 36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; ABSORPTION; ENERGY TRANSFER; EXCITATION; ION COLLISIONS; MANY-BODY PROBLEM; NICKEL IONS; POTENTIALS; SLOWING-DOWN; SOLIDS; STOPPING POWER; SURFACES

Citation Formats

Gruener, Florian, and Bell, Friedhelm. Heavy-ion stopping in solids: Energy transfer to the target or the dragging force due to the induced potential wake. United States: N. p., 2005. Web. doi:10.1103/PhysRevA.72.024902.
Gruener, Florian, & Bell, Friedhelm. Heavy-ion stopping in solids: Energy transfer to the target or the dragging force due to the induced potential wake. United States. doi:10.1103/PhysRevA.72.024902.
Gruener, Florian, and Bell, Friedhelm. Mon . "Heavy-ion stopping in solids: Energy transfer to the target or the dragging force due to the induced potential wake". United States. doi:10.1103/PhysRevA.72.024902.
@article{osti_20718241,
title = {Heavy-ion stopping in solids: Energy transfer to the target or the dragging force due to the induced potential wake},
author = {Gruener, Florian and Bell, Friedhelm},
abstractNote = {There are two different approaches for describing the slowing down of charged particles in solids, commonly used in a separate way. Either one treats the energy transfer to the target or considers the dragging force due to the induced potential ('wake'). We herewith present a classical many-body calculation which intrinsically allows simultaneously both descriptions. For the first time, we can follow in detail the development of the stopping power, the projectile's charge and excitation state, as well as the formation of the wake, for ions entering into a solid. We further show that in nonequilibrium, stopping the development of the wake contributes much stronger to the change in stopping power than one could expect from the corresponding change of the projectile's charge or excitation state. This is exemplified by the explanation of an experimentally observed surface enhancement in the stopping power, which sheds new light on analysis tools with single atomic depth resolution. We underline our findings by simulating also anti-Ni ions, which are found to form a pressure wave in contrast to trailing wakes in the case of Ni ions.},
doi = {10.1103/PhysRevA.72.024902},
journal = {Physical Review. A},
issn = {1050-2947},
number = 2,
volume = 72,
place = {United States},
year = {2005},
month = {8}
}