skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Brain slice invasion model reveals genes differentially regulated in glioma invasion

Abstract

Invasion of tumor cells into adjacent brain areas is one of the major problems in treatment of glioma patients. To identify genes that might contribute to invasion, fluorescent F98 glioma cells were allowed to invade an organotypic brain slice. Gene expression analysis revealed 5 up-regulated and 14 down-regulated genes in invasive glioma cells as compared to non-invasive glioma cells. Two gene products, ferritin and cyclin B1, were verified in human gliomas by immunohistochemistry. Ferritin exhibited high mRNA levels in migratory F98 cells and also showed higher protein expression in the infiltrating edge of human gliomas. Cyclin B1 with high mRNA expression levels in stationary F98 cells showed marked protein expression in the central portions of gliomas. These findings are compatible with the concept of tumor cells either proliferating or migrating. Our study is the first to apply brain slice cultures for the identification of differentially regulated genes in glioma invasion.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [2];  [2];  [2];  [3];  [3];  [2]
  1. Institute of Neuropathology, Charite Universitaetsmedizin Berlin (Germany). E-mail: nikola.holtkamp@charite.de
  2. Institute of Neuropathology, Charite Universitaetsmedizin Berlin (Germany)
  3. Max Delbrueck Center for Molecular Medicine, Cellular Neuroscience, Berlin (Germany)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20713422
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications; Journal Volume: 336; Journal Issue: 4; Other Information: DOI: 10.1016/j.bbrc.2005.08.253; PII: S0006-291X(05)01957-1; Copyright (c) 2005 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, The Netherlands, All rights reserved; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; BRAIN; FERRITIN; GENES; GLIOMAS; PATIENTS; TUMOR CELLS

Citation Formats

Holtkamp, Nikola, Afanasieva, Anastasia, Elstner, Anja, Landeghem, Frank K.H. van, Koenneker, Matthias, Kuhn, Susanne A., Kettenmann, Helmut, and Deimling, Andreas von. Brain slice invasion model reveals genes differentially regulated in glioma invasion. United States: N. p., 2005. Web. doi:10.1016/j.bbrc.2005.08.253.
Holtkamp, Nikola, Afanasieva, Anastasia, Elstner, Anja, Landeghem, Frank K.H. van, Koenneker, Matthias, Kuhn, Susanne A., Kettenmann, Helmut, & Deimling, Andreas von. Brain slice invasion model reveals genes differentially regulated in glioma invasion. United States. doi:10.1016/j.bbrc.2005.08.253.
Holtkamp, Nikola, Afanasieva, Anastasia, Elstner, Anja, Landeghem, Frank K.H. van, Koenneker, Matthias, Kuhn, Susanne A., Kettenmann, Helmut, and Deimling, Andreas von. Fri . "Brain slice invasion model reveals genes differentially regulated in glioma invasion". United States. doi:10.1016/j.bbrc.2005.08.253.
@article{osti_20713422,
title = {Brain slice invasion model reveals genes differentially regulated in glioma invasion},
author = {Holtkamp, Nikola and Afanasieva, Anastasia and Elstner, Anja and Landeghem, Frank K.H. van and Koenneker, Matthias and Kuhn, Susanne A. and Kettenmann, Helmut and Deimling, Andreas von},
abstractNote = {Invasion of tumor cells into adjacent brain areas is one of the major problems in treatment of glioma patients. To identify genes that might contribute to invasion, fluorescent F98 glioma cells were allowed to invade an organotypic brain slice. Gene expression analysis revealed 5 up-regulated and 14 down-regulated genes in invasive glioma cells as compared to non-invasive glioma cells. Two gene products, ferritin and cyclin B1, were verified in human gliomas by immunohistochemistry. Ferritin exhibited high mRNA levels in migratory F98 cells and also showed higher protein expression in the infiltrating edge of human gliomas. Cyclin B1 with high mRNA expression levels in stationary F98 cells showed marked protein expression in the central portions of gliomas. These findings are compatible with the concept of tumor cells either proliferating or migrating. Our study is the first to apply brain slice cultures for the identification of differentially regulated genes in glioma invasion.},
doi = {10.1016/j.bbrc.2005.08.253},
journal = {Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications},
number = 4,
volume = 336,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Nov 04 00:00:00 EST 2005},
month = {Fri Nov 04 00:00:00 EST 2005}
}
  • The application of positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) and Doppler broadening spectroscopy (DBS) to the study of animal or human tissue has only recently been reported [G. Liu, et al. phys. stat. sol. (C) 4, Nos. 10, 3912-3915 (2007)]. We have initiated a study of normal brain section and brain section with glioma derived from a rat glioma model. For the rat glioma model, 200,000 C6 cells were implanted in the basal ganglion of adult Sprague Dawley rats. The rats were sacrificed at 21 days after implantation. The brains were harvested, sliced into 2 mm thick coronal sections, and fixedmore » in 4% formalin. PALS lifetime runs were made with the samples soaked in formalin, and there was not significant evaporation of formalin during the runs. The lifetime spectra were analyzed into two lifetime components. While early results suggested a small decrease in ortho-Positronium (o-Ps) pickoff lifetime between the normal brain section and brain section with glioma, further runs with additional samples have showed no statistically significant difference between the normal and tumor tissue for this type of tumor. The o-Ps lifetime in formalin alone was lower than either the normal tissue or glioma sample. So annihilation in the formalin absorbed in the samples would lower the o-Ps lifetime and this may have masked any difference due to the glioma itself. DBS was also used to investigate the difference in positronium formation between tumor and normal tissue. Tissue samples are heterogeneous and this needs to be carefully considered if PALS and DBS are to become useful tools in distinguishing tissue samples.« less
  • Purpose: To investigate a spatiotemporally optimal radiotherapy prescription scheme and its potential benefit for glioblastoma (GBM) patients using the proliferation and invasion (PI) glioma model. Methods: Standard prescription for GBM was assumed to deliver 46Gy in 23 fractions to GTV1+2cm margin and additional 14Gy in 7 fractions to GTV2+2cm margin. We simulated the tumor proliferation and invasion in 2D according to the PI glioma model with a moving velocity of 0.029(slow-move), 0.079(average-move), and 0.13(fast-move) mm/day for GTV2 with a radius of 1 and 2cm. For each tumor, the margin around GTV1 and GTV2 was varied to 0–6 cm and 1–3more » cm respectively. Total dose to GTV1 was constrained such that the equivalent uniform dose (EUD) to normal brain equals EUD with the standard prescription. A non-stationary dose policy, where the fractional dose varies, was investigated to estimate the temporal effect of the radiation dose. The efficacy of an optimal prescription scheme was evaluated by tumor cell-surviving fraction (SF), EUD, and the expected survival time. Results: Optimal prescription for the slow-move tumors was to use 3.0(small)-3.5(large) cm margins to GTV1, and 1.5cm margin to GTV2. For the average- and fast-move tumors, it was optimal to use 6.0cm margin for GTV1 suggesting that whole brain therapy is optimal, and then 1.5cm (average-move) and 1.5–3.0cm (fast-move, small-large) margins for GTV2. It was optimal to deliver the boost sequentially using a linearly decreasing fractional dose for all tumors. Optimal prescription led to 0.001–0.465% of the tumor SF resulted from using the standard prescription, and increased tumor EUD by 25.3–49.3% and the estimated survival time by 7.6–22.2 months. Conclusion: It is feasible to optimize a prescription scheme depending on the individual tumor characteristics. A personalized prescription scheme could potentially increase tumor EUD and the expected survival time significantly without increasing EUD to normal brain.« less
  • Cited by 32
  • To assess the potential of a T1-weighted, gadolinium-enhanced MR technique for quantifying radiation-induced changes of blood-brain barrier permeability in a model of stereotactically implanted intracerebral gliomas in rats. We calculated the gadolinium blood-to-tissue transport coefficient for gadopentetate dimeglumine from signal intensities in sequential MR images in nine control animals that were not irradiated and in five and three animals that had received 2500 cGy and 1500 cGy whole-brain irradiation, respectively, at 2 days before imaging. The average blood-to-tissue transport coefficient values were 9.76 mL[center dot]kg[sup [minus]1][center dot]min[sup [minus]1] in the control group, 23.41 mL[center dot]kg[sup [minus]1][center dot]min[sup [minus]1] in themore » 2500-cGy group, and 25.63 mL[center dot]kg[sup [minus]1][center dot]min[sup [minus]1] in the 1500-cGy group. Blood-to-tissue transport coefficients were significantly higher after irradiation, indicating increased radiation-induced blood-brain barrier permeability. Similar increased blood-brain barrier leakiness in brain tumors after high-dose irradiation has been shown by previous nuclear medicine studies using quantitative autoradiography. Contrast-enhanced dynamic MR of brain gliomas is a sensitive method to document radiation-induced blood-brain barrier breakdown. Quantitative gadolinium-enhanced MR may become a useful tool for the management of patients with brain tumors undergoing radiation therapy. 28 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.« less
  • Exposure to polychlorinated biphenyls impairs cognition and behavior in children. Two environmental PCBs 2,2',3,3',4,4',5-heptachlorobiphenyl (PCB170) and 2,2',3,5',6-pentachlorobiphenyl (PCB95) were examined in vitro for influences on synaptic transmission in rat hippocampal slices. Field excitatory postsynaptic potentials (fEPSPs) were recorded in the CA1 region using a multi-electrode array. Perfusion with PCB170 (10 nM) had no effect on fEPSP slope relative to baseline period, whereas (100 nM) initially enhanced then depressed fEPSP slope. Perfusion of PCB95 (10 or 100 nM) persistently enhanced fEPSP slope > 200%, an effect that could be inhibited by dantrolene, a drug that attenuates ryanodine receptor signaling. Perfusion withmore » picrotoxin (PTX) to block GABA neurotransmission resulted in a modest increase in fEPSP slope, whereas PTX + PCB170 (1-100 nM) persistently enhanced fEPSP slope in a dose dependent manner. fEPSP slope reached > 250% of baseline period in the presence of PTX + 100 nM PCB170, conditions that evoked marked epileptiform after-potential discharges. PCB95 and PCB170 were found to differentially influence the Ca{sup 2+}-dependence of [{sup 3}H]ryanodine-binding to hippocampal ryanodine receptors. Non-coplanar PCB congeners can differentially alter neurotransmission in a manner suggesting they can elicit imbalances between inhibitory and excitatory circuits within the hippocampus. Differential sensitization of ryanodine receptors by Ca{sup 2+} appears to mediate, at least in part, hippocampal excitotoxicity by non-coplanar PCBs.« less