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Title: High-temperature fiber optic cubic-zirconia pressure sensor - article no. 124402

Abstract

There is a critical need for pressure sensors that can operate reliably at high temperatures in many industrial segments such as in the combustion section of gas turbine engines for both transportation and power generation, coal gasifiers, coal fired boilers, etc. Optical-based sensors are particularly attractive for the measurement of a wide variety of physical and chemical parameters in high-temperature and high-pressure industrial environments due to their small size and immunity to electromagnetic interference. A fiber optic pressure sensor utilizing single-crystal cubic zirconia as the sensing element is reported. The pressure response of this sensor has been measured at temperatures up to 1000{sup o}C. Additional experimental results show that cubic zirconia could be used for pressure sensing at temperatures over 1000{sup o}C. This study demonstrates the feasibility of using a novel cubic-zirconia sensor for pressure measurement at high temperatures.

Authors:
; ;  [1]
  1. Virginia Polytechnic Institute & State University, Blacksburg, VA (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20712412
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Optical Engineering; Journal Volume: 44; Journal Issue: 12
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
20 FOSSIL-FUELED POWER PLANTS; 01 COAL, LIGNITE, AND PEAT; PRESSURE MEASUREMENT; FIBER OPTICS; ZIRCONIUM OXIDES; CRYSTALS; GAS TURBINES; BOILERS; GAS GENERATORS

Citation Formats

Peng, W., Pickrell, G.R., and Wang, A.B. High-temperature fiber optic cubic-zirconia pressure sensor - article no. 124402. United States: N. p., 2005. Web.
Peng, W., Pickrell, G.R., & Wang, A.B. High-temperature fiber optic cubic-zirconia pressure sensor - article no. 124402. United States.
Peng, W., Pickrell, G.R., and Wang, A.B. Thu . "High-temperature fiber optic cubic-zirconia pressure sensor - article no. 124402". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_20712412,
title = {High-temperature fiber optic cubic-zirconia pressure sensor - article no. 124402},
author = {Peng, W. and Pickrell, G.R. and Wang, A.B.},
abstractNote = {There is a critical need for pressure sensors that can operate reliably at high temperatures in many industrial segments such as in the combustion section of gas turbine engines for both transportation and power generation, coal gasifiers, coal fired boilers, etc. Optical-based sensors are particularly attractive for the measurement of a wide variety of physical and chemical parameters in high-temperature and high-pressure industrial environments due to their small size and immunity to electromagnetic interference. A fiber optic pressure sensor utilizing single-crystal cubic zirconia as the sensing element is reported. The pressure response of this sensor has been measured at temperatures up to 1000{sup o}C. Additional experimental results show that cubic zirconia could be used for pressure sensing at temperatures over 1000{sup o}C. This study demonstrates the feasibility of using a novel cubic-zirconia sensor for pressure measurement at high temperatures.},
doi = {},
journal = {Optical Engineering},
number = 12,
volume = 44,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Dec 15 00:00:00 EST 2005},
month = {Thu Dec 15 00:00:00 EST 2005}
}
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