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Title: CFD modeling could optimize sorbent injection system efficiency

Abstract

Several technologies will probably be needed to remove mercury from coal-plant stack emissions as mandated by new mercury emission control legislation in the USA. One of the most promising mercury removal approaches is the injection of a sorbent, such as powdered activated carbon (PAC), to make it much more controllable. ADA-ES recently simulated field tests of sorbent injection at New England Power Company's Brayton Point Power Plant in Somerset, Mass., where activated carbon sorbent was injected using a set of eight lances upstream of the second of two electrostatic precipitators (ESPs). Consultants from Fluent created a computational model of the ductwork and injection lances. The simulation results showed that the flue gas flow was poorly distributed at the sorbent injection plane, and that a small region of reverse flow occurred, a result of the flow pattern at the exit of the first ESP. The results also illustrated that the flow was predominantly in the lower half of the duct, and affected by some upstream turning vanes. The simulations demonstrated the value of CFD as a diagnostic tool. They were performed in a fraction of the time and cost required for the physical tests yet provided far more diagnostic information, suchmore » as the distribution of mercury and sorbent at each point in the computational domain. 1 fig.« less

Authors:
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20712324
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Power Engineering (Barrington); Journal Volume: 110; Journal Issue: 1
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
01 COAL, LIGNITE, AND PEAT; 20 FOSSIL-FUELED POWER PLANTS; SORBENT INJECTION PROCESSES; OPTIMIZATION; COMPUTERIZED SIMULATION; EFFICIENCY; FLUE GAS; DESIGN; FLOW MODELS; USA; MERCURY; AIR POLLUTION CONTROL; ACTIVATED CARBON; FIELD TESTS; MASSACHUSETTS; NOZZLES; POLLUTION CONTROL EQUIPMENT; FOSSIL-FUEL POWER PLANTS; GAS FLOW

Citation Formats

Blankinship, S. CFD modeling could optimize sorbent injection system efficiency. United States: N. p., 2006. Web.
Blankinship, S. CFD modeling could optimize sorbent injection system efficiency. United States.
Blankinship, S. Sun . "CFD modeling could optimize sorbent injection system efficiency". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_20712324,
title = {CFD modeling could optimize sorbent injection system efficiency},
author = {Blankinship, S.},
abstractNote = {Several technologies will probably be needed to remove mercury from coal-plant stack emissions as mandated by new mercury emission control legislation in the USA. One of the most promising mercury removal approaches is the injection of a sorbent, such as powdered activated carbon (PAC), to make it much more controllable. ADA-ES recently simulated field tests of sorbent injection at New England Power Company's Brayton Point Power Plant in Somerset, Mass., where activated carbon sorbent was injected using a set of eight lances upstream of the second of two electrostatic precipitators (ESPs). Consultants from Fluent created a computational model of the ductwork and injection lances. The simulation results showed that the flue gas flow was poorly distributed at the sorbent injection plane, and that a small region of reverse flow occurred, a result of the flow pattern at the exit of the first ESP. The results also illustrated that the flow was predominantly in the lower half of the duct, and affected by some upstream turning vanes. The simulations demonstrated the value of CFD as a diagnostic tool. They were performed in a fraction of the time and cost required for the physical tests yet provided far more diagnostic information, such as the distribution of mercury and sorbent at each point in the computational domain. 1 fig.},
doi = {},
journal = {Power Engineering (Barrington)},
number = 1,
volume = 110,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Jan 15 00:00:00 EST 2006},
month = {Sun Jan 15 00:00:00 EST 2006}
}