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Title: CFD modeling could optimize sorbent injection system efficiency

Abstract

Several technologies will probably be needed to remove mercury from coal-plant stack emissions as mandated by new mercury emission control legislation in the USA. One of the most promising mercury removal approaches is the injection of a sorbent, such as powdered activated carbon (PAC), to make it much more controllable. ADA-ES recently simulated field tests of sorbent injection at New England Power Company's Brayton Point Power Plant in Somerset, Mass., where activated carbon sorbent was injected using a set of eight lances upstream of the second of two electrostatic precipitators (ESPs). Consultants from Fluent created a computational model of the ductwork and injection lances. The simulation results showed that the flue gas flow was poorly distributed at the sorbent injection plane, and that a small region of reverse flow occurred, a result of the flow pattern at the exit of the first ESP. The results also illustrated that the flow was predominantly in the lower half of the duct, and affected by some upstream turning vanes. The simulations demonstrated the value of CFD as a diagnostic tool. They were performed in a fraction of the time and cost required for the physical tests yet provided far more diagnostic information, suchmore » as the distribution of mercury and sorbent at each point in the computational domain. 1 fig.« less

Authors:
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20712324
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Power Engineering (Barrington); Journal Volume: 110; Journal Issue: 1
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
01 COAL, LIGNITE, AND PEAT; 20 FOSSIL-FUELED POWER PLANTS; SORBENT INJECTION PROCESSES; OPTIMIZATION; COMPUTERIZED SIMULATION; EFFICIENCY; FLUE GAS; DESIGN; FLOW MODELS; USA; MERCURY; AIR POLLUTION CONTROL; ACTIVATED CARBON; FIELD TESTS; MASSACHUSETTS; NOZZLES; POLLUTION CONTROL EQUIPMENT; FOSSIL-FUEL POWER PLANTS; GAS FLOW

Citation Formats

Blankinship, S. CFD modeling could optimize sorbent injection system efficiency. United States: N. p., 2006. Web.
Blankinship, S. CFD modeling could optimize sorbent injection system efficiency. United States.
Blankinship, S. Sun . "CFD modeling could optimize sorbent injection system efficiency". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_20712324,
title = {CFD modeling could optimize sorbent injection system efficiency},
author = {Blankinship, S.},
abstractNote = {Several technologies will probably be needed to remove mercury from coal-plant stack emissions as mandated by new mercury emission control legislation in the USA. One of the most promising mercury removal approaches is the injection of a sorbent, such as powdered activated carbon (PAC), to make it much more controllable. ADA-ES recently simulated field tests of sorbent injection at New England Power Company's Brayton Point Power Plant in Somerset, Mass., where activated carbon sorbent was injected using a set of eight lances upstream of the second of two electrostatic precipitators (ESPs). Consultants from Fluent created a computational model of the ductwork and injection lances. The simulation results showed that the flue gas flow was poorly distributed at the sorbent injection plane, and that a small region of reverse flow occurred, a result of the flow pattern at the exit of the first ESP. The results also illustrated that the flow was predominantly in the lower half of the duct, and affected by some upstream turning vanes. The simulations demonstrated the value of CFD as a diagnostic tool. They were performed in a fraction of the time and cost required for the physical tests yet provided far more diagnostic information, such as the distribution of mercury and sorbent at each point in the computational domain. 1 fig.},
doi = {},
journal = {Power Engineering (Barrington)},
number = 1,
volume = 110,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Jan 15 00:00:00 EST 2006},
month = {Sun Jan 15 00:00:00 EST 2006}
}
  • Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations are used to investigate a low temperature post-combustion carbon capture reactor. The CFD models are based on a small scale solid sorbent carbon capture reactor design from ADA-ES and Southern Company. The reactor is a fluidized bed design based on a silica-supported amine sorbent. CFD models using both Eulerian-Eulerian and Eulerian-Lagrangian multi-phase modeling methods are developed to investigate the hydrodynamics and adsorption of carbon dioxide in the reactor. Models developed in both FLUENT® and BARRACUDA are presented to explore the strengths and weaknesses of state of the art CFD codes for modeling multi-phase carbon capturemore » reactors. The results of the simulations show that the FLUENT® Eulerian-Lagrangian simulations (DDPM) are unstable for the given reactor design; while the BARRACUDA Eulerian-Lagrangian model is able to simulate the system given appropriate simplifying assumptions. FLUENT® Eulerian-Eulerian simulations also provide a stable solution for the carbon capture reactor given the appropriate simplifying assumptions.« less
  • Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations are used to investigate a low temperature post-combustion carbon capture reactor. The CFD models are based on a small scale solid sorbent carbon capture reactor design from ADA-ES and Southern Company. The reactor is a fluidized bed design based on a silica-supported amine sorbent. CFD models using both Eulerian–Eulerian and Eulerian–Lagrangian multi-phase modeling methods are developed to investigate the hydrodynamics and adsorption of carbon dioxide in the reactor. Models developed in both FLUENT® and BARRACUDA are presented to explore the strengths and weaknesses of state of the art CFD codes for modeling multi-phase carbon capturemore » reactors. The results of the simulations show that the FLUENT® Eulerian–Lagrangian simulations (DDPM) are unstable for the given reactor design; while the BARRACUDA Eulerian–Lagrangian model is able to simulate the system given appropriate simplifying assumptions. FLUENT® Eulerian–Eulerian simulations also provide a stable solution for the carbon capture reactor given the appropriate simplifying assumptions.« less
  • A mathematical model based on simple cake filtration theory was coupled to a previously developed two-stage mathematical model for mercury (Hg) removal from coal combustion using powdered activated carbon injection upstream of a baghouse filter. Values of the average permeability of the filter cake and the filter resistance extracted from the model were 4.4 x 10{sup -13}m{sup 2} and 2.5 x 10{sup -4}m{sup -1}, respectively. The flow is redistributed during partial cleaning of the filter, with flows higher across the newly cleaned filter section. The calculated average Hg removal efficiency from the baghouse is lower because of the high massmore » flux of Hg exiting the filter in the newly cleaned section. The model shows that calculated average Hg removal is affected by permeability, filter resistance, fraction of the baghouse cleaned, and cleaning interval. 17 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.« less
  • A digital control system which provides unit commitment functions and real-time generation control while optimizing plant operating efficiency was put in service at a powerplant on June 1, 1987. The theory of the unit commitment and generation allocation schemes is presented. Results showing the operating efficiency gains during the first year of system operation are given.
  • Post-combustion solid sorbent carbon capture systems are being studied via computational modeling as part of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Carbon Capture Simulation Initiative (CCSI). The work focuses on computational modeling of device-scale multi-phase computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations for given carbon capture reactor configurations to predict flow properties, outlet compositions, temperature and pressure. The detailed outputs of the device-scale models provide valuable insight into the operation of new carbon capture devices and will help in the design and optimization of carbon capture systems. As a first step in this project we have focused on modeling a 1 kWe solidmore » sorbent carbon capture system using the commercial CFD software ANSYS FLUENT®. Using the multi-phase models available in ANSYS FLUENT®, we are investigating the use of Eulerian-Eulerian and Eulerian-Lagrangian methods for modeling a fluidized bed carbon capture design. The applicability of the dense discrete phase method (DDPM) is being considered along with the more traditional Eulerian-Eulerian multi-phase model. In this paper we will discuss the design of the 1 kWe solid sorbent system and the setup of the DDPM and Eulerian-Eulerian models used to simulate the system. The results of the hydrodynamics in the system will be discussed and the predictions of the DDPM and Eulerian-Eulerian simulations will be compared. A discussion of the sensitivity of the model to boundary and initial conditions, computational meshing, granular pressure, and drag sub-models will also be presented.« less