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Title: Can lightning be a noise source for a spherical gravitational wave antenna?

Abstract

The detection of gravitational waves is a very active research field at the moment. In Brazil the gravitational wave detector is called Mario SCHENBERG. Because of its high sensitivity it is necessary to model mathematically all known noise sources so that digital filters can be developed that maximize the signal-to-noise ratio. One of the noise sources that must be considered are the disturbances caused by electromagnetic pulses due to lightnings close to the experiment. Such disturbances may influence the vibrations of the antenna's normal modes and mask possible gravitational wave signals. In this work we model the interaction between lightnings and SCHENBERG antenna and calculate the intensity of the noise due to a close lightning stroke in the detected signal. We find that the noise generated does not disturb the experiment significantly.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3];  [4];  [1]
  1. Centro Federal de Educacao Tecnologica de Sao Paulo, Rua Pedro Vicente 625, Sao Paulo, SP 01109-010 (Brazil)
  2. (Brazil)
  3. Departamento de Fisica, Instituto Tecnologico de Aeronautica, Pca. Mal. Eduardo Gomes 50, Sao Jose dos Campos, SP 12228-900 (Brazil)
  4. Divisao de Astrofisica, Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais, Av. dos Astronautas 1758, Sao Jose dos Campos, SP 12227-010 (Brazil)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20711517
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Physical Review. D, Particles Fields; Journal Volume: 72; Journal Issue: 10; Other Information: DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevD.72.102003; (c) 2005 The American Physical Society; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
72 PHYSICS OF ELEMENTARY PARTICLES AND FIELDS; 58 GEOSCIENCES; ANTENNAS; DETECTION; DIGITAL FILTERS; DISTURBANCES; ELECTROMAGNETIC PULSES; GRAVITATIONAL WAVE DETECTORS; GRAVITATIONAL WAVES; LIGHTNING; NOISE; SENSITIVITY; SIGNAL-TO-NOISE RATIO; SIGNALS

Citation Formats

Magalhaes, Nadja Simao, Departamento de Fisica, Instituto Tecnologico de Aeronautica, Pca. Mal. Eduardo Gomes 50, Sao Jose dos Campos, SP 12228-900, Marinho, Rubens de Melo Jr., Aguiar, Odylio Denys de, and Frajuca, Carlos. Can lightning be a noise source for a spherical gravitational wave antenna?. United States: N. p., 2005. Web. doi:10.1103/PhysRevD.72.102003.
Magalhaes, Nadja Simao, Departamento de Fisica, Instituto Tecnologico de Aeronautica, Pca. Mal. Eduardo Gomes 50, Sao Jose dos Campos, SP 12228-900, Marinho, Rubens de Melo Jr., Aguiar, Odylio Denys de, & Frajuca, Carlos. Can lightning be a noise source for a spherical gravitational wave antenna?. United States. doi:10.1103/PhysRevD.72.102003.
Magalhaes, Nadja Simao, Departamento de Fisica, Instituto Tecnologico de Aeronautica, Pca. Mal. Eduardo Gomes 50, Sao Jose dos Campos, SP 12228-900, Marinho, Rubens de Melo Jr., Aguiar, Odylio Denys de, and Frajuca, Carlos. Tue . "Can lightning be a noise source for a spherical gravitational wave antenna?". United States. doi:10.1103/PhysRevD.72.102003.
@article{osti_20711517,
title = {Can lightning be a noise source for a spherical gravitational wave antenna?},
author = {Magalhaes, Nadja Simao and Departamento de Fisica, Instituto Tecnologico de Aeronautica, Pca. Mal. Eduardo Gomes 50, Sao Jose dos Campos, SP 12228-900 and Marinho, Rubens de Melo Jr. and Aguiar, Odylio Denys de and Frajuca, Carlos},
abstractNote = {The detection of gravitational waves is a very active research field at the moment. In Brazil the gravitational wave detector is called Mario SCHENBERG. Because of its high sensitivity it is necessary to model mathematically all known noise sources so that digital filters can be developed that maximize the signal-to-noise ratio. One of the noise sources that must be considered are the disturbances caused by electromagnetic pulses due to lightnings close to the experiment. Such disturbances may influence the vibrations of the antenna's normal modes and mask possible gravitational wave signals. In this work we model the interaction between lightnings and SCHENBERG antenna and calculate the intensity of the noise due to a close lightning stroke in the detected signal. We find that the noise generated does not disturb the experiment significantly.},
doi = {10.1103/PhysRevD.72.102003},
journal = {Physical Review. D, Particles Fields},
number = 10,
volume = 72,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Nov 15 00:00:00 EST 2005},
month = {Tue Nov 15 00:00:00 EST 2005}
}
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