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Title: Synchronizations in small-world networks of spiking neurons: Diffusive versus sigmoid couplings

Abstract

By using a semianalytical dynamical mean-field approximation previously proposed by the author [H. Hasegawa, Phys. Rev. E 70, 066107 (2004)], we have studied the synchronization of stochastic, small-world (SW) networks of FitzHugh-Nagumo neurons with diffusive couplings. The difference and similarity between results for diffusive and sigmoid couplings have been discussed. It has been shown that with introducing the weak heterogeneity to regular networks, the synchronization may be slightly increased for diffusive couplings, while it is decreased for sigmoid couplings. This increase in the synchronization for diffusive couplings is shown to be due to their local, negative feedback contributions, but not due to the short average distance in SW networks. Synchronization of SW networks depends not only on their structure but also on the type of couplings.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Department of Physics, Tokyo Gakugei University, Koganei, Tokyo 184-8501 (Japan)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20709840
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Physical Review. E, Statistical Physics, Plasmas, Fluids, and Related Interdisciplinary Topics; Journal Volume: 72; Journal Issue: 5; Other Information: DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevE.72.056139; (c) 2005 The American Physical Society; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; FEEDBACK; MEAN-FIELD THEORY; NEURAL NETWORKS; STOCHASTIC PROCESSES; SYNCHRONIZATION

Citation Formats

Hasegawa, Hideo. Synchronizations in small-world networks of spiking neurons: Diffusive versus sigmoid couplings. United States: N. p., 2005. Web. doi:10.1103/PhysRevE.72.056139.
Hasegawa, Hideo. Synchronizations in small-world networks of spiking neurons: Diffusive versus sigmoid couplings. United States. doi:10.1103/PhysRevE.72.056139.
Hasegawa, Hideo. Tue . "Synchronizations in small-world networks of spiking neurons: Diffusive versus sigmoid couplings". United States. doi:10.1103/PhysRevE.72.056139.
@article{osti_20709840,
title = {Synchronizations in small-world networks of spiking neurons: Diffusive versus sigmoid couplings},
author = {Hasegawa, Hideo},
abstractNote = {By using a semianalytical dynamical mean-field approximation previously proposed by the author [H. Hasegawa, Phys. Rev. E 70, 066107 (2004)], we have studied the synchronization of stochastic, small-world (SW) networks of FitzHugh-Nagumo neurons with diffusive couplings. The difference and similarity between results for diffusive and sigmoid couplings have been discussed. It has been shown that with introducing the weak heterogeneity to regular networks, the synchronization may be slightly increased for diffusive couplings, while it is decreased for sigmoid couplings. This increase in the synchronization for diffusive couplings is shown to be due to their local, negative feedback contributions, but not due to the short average distance in SW networks. Synchronization of SW networks depends not only on their structure but also on the type of couplings.},
doi = {10.1103/PhysRevE.72.056139},
journal = {Physical Review. E, Statistical Physics, Plasmas, Fluids, and Related Interdisciplinary Topics},
number = 5,
volume = 72,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Nov 01 00:00:00 EST 2005},
month = {Tue Nov 01 00:00:00 EST 2005}
}
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