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Title: Maintaining appearances-The role of p53 in adult neurogenesis

Abstract

In the adult mammalian brain, neuronal turnover continues to replenish cells in existing neuronal circuits, such as those involved either in odor discrimination or in learning and memory, throughout life. With age, however, the capacity for neurogenesis diminishes and these functions become impaired. Neuronal turnover is a two-step process, which first generates excess neuronal progenitors and then eliminates all but the few that differentiate into fully functional neurons. This process requires a fine balance between cell proliferation and cell death. Altered activity of the tumor suppressor p53 can upset this balance by affecting the rate of cell proliferation, but not the rate of cell death, in neurogenic regions of the adult brain. Genetically engineered mice in which p53 activity is increased demonstrate that premature loss of neurogenic capacity is linked to accelerated organismal aging.

Authors:
 [1];  [2]
  1. Department of Neuroscience, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22908 (United Kingdom)
  2. Department of Neuroscience, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22908 (United Kingdom). E-mail: hs2n@virginia.edu
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20709225
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications; Journal Volume: 331; Journal Issue: 3; Other Information: DOI: 10.1016/j.bbrc.2005.03.194; PII: S0006-291X(05)00721-7; Copyright (c) 2005 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, The Netherlands, All rights reserved; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; ADULTS; AGING; APOPTOSIS; CELL PROLIFERATION; MICE; NEOPLASMS; NERVE CELLS; ODOR; OLFACTORY BULBS; STEM CELLS

Citation Formats

Medrano, Silvia, and Scrable, Heidi. Maintaining appearances-The role of p53 in adult neurogenesis. United States: N. p., 2005. Web. doi:10.1016/j.bbrc.2005.03.194.
Medrano, Silvia, & Scrable, Heidi. Maintaining appearances-The role of p53 in adult neurogenesis. United States. doi:10.1016/j.bbrc.2005.03.194.
Medrano, Silvia, and Scrable, Heidi. 2005. "Maintaining appearances-The role of p53 in adult neurogenesis". United States. doi:10.1016/j.bbrc.2005.03.194.
@article{osti_20709225,
title = {Maintaining appearances-The role of p53 in adult neurogenesis},
author = {Medrano, Silvia and Scrable, Heidi},
abstractNote = {In the adult mammalian brain, neuronal turnover continues to replenish cells in existing neuronal circuits, such as those involved either in odor discrimination or in learning and memory, throughout life. With age, however, the capacity for neurogenesis diminishes and these functions become impaired. Neuronal turnover is a two-step process, which first generates excess neuronal progenitors and then eliminates all but the few that differentiate into fully functional neurons. This process requires a fine balance between cell proliferation and cell death. Altered activity of the tumor suppressor p53 can upset this balance by affecting the rate of cell proliferation, but not the rate of cell death, in neurogenic regions of the adult brain. Genetically engineered mice in which p53 activity is increased demonstrate that premature loss of neurogenic capacity is linked to accelerated organismal aging.},
doi = {10.1016/j.bbrc.2005.03.194},
journal = {Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications},
number = 3,
volume = 331,
place = {United States},
year = 2005,
month = 6
}
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