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Title: Deployment of titanium thermal barrier for low-temperature carbon nanotube growth

Abstract

Chemical vapor-synthesized carbon nanotubes are typically grown at temperatures around 600 deg. C. We report on the deployment of a titanium layer to help elevate the constraints on the substrate temperature during plasma-assisted growth. The growth is possible through the lowering of the hydrocarbon content used in the deposition, with the only source of heat provided by the plasma. The nanotubes synthesized have a small diameter distribution, which deviates from the usual trend that the diameter is determined by the thickness of the catalyst film. Simple thermodynamic simulations also show that the quantity of heat, that can be distributed, is determined by the thickness of the titanium layer. Despite the lower synthesis temperature, it is shown that this technique allows for high growth rates as well as better quality nanotubes.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ;  [1];  [2]
  1. Nano-Electronic Centre, Advanced Technology Institute, School of Electronics and Physical Science, University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey GU2 7XH (United Kingdom)
  2. (United Kingdom)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20706507
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Applied Physics Letters; Journal Volume: 87; Journal Issue: 25; Other Information: DOI: 10.1063/1.2150587; (c) 2005 American Institute of Physics; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; CARBON; CATALYSTS; CHEMICAL VAPOR DEPOSITION; CRYSTAL GROWTH; FILMS; HYDROCARBONS; LAYERS; NANOTUBES; PLASMA; SIMULATION; SUBSTRATES; SYNTHESIS; TEMPERATURE RANGE 0400-1000 K; THERMAL BARRIERS; TITANIUM

Citation Formats

Chen, G.Y., Poa, C.H.P., Henley, S.J., Stolojan, V., Silva, S.R.P., Haq, Sajad, and Advanced Technology Centre, Sowerby Building, BAE SYSTEMS, Filton FPC 267, Bristol BS34 7QW. Deployment of titanium thermal barrier for low-temperature carbon nanotube growth. United States: N. p., 2005. Web. doi:10.1063/1.2150587.
Chen, G.Y., Poa, C.H.P., Henley, S.J., Stolojan, V., Silva, S.R.P., Haq, Sajad, & Advanced Technology Centre, Sowerby Building, BAE SYSTEMS, Filton FPC 267, Bristol BS34 7QW. Deployment of titanium thermal barrier for low-temperature carbon nanotube growth. United States. doi:10.1063/1.2150587.
Chen, G.Y., Poa, C.H.P., Henley, S.J., Stolojan, V., Silva, S.R.P., Haq, Sajad, and Advanced Technology Centre, Sowerby Building, BAE SYSTEMS, Filton FPC 267, Bristol BS34 7QW. Mon . "Deployment of titanium thermal barrier for low-temperature carbon nanotube growth". United States. doi:10.1063/1.2150587.
@article{osti_20706507,
title = {Deployment of titanium thermal barrier for low-temperature carbon nanotube growth},
author = {Chen, G.Y. and Poa, C.H.P. and Henley, S.J. and Stolojan, V. and Silva, S.R.P. and Haq, Sajad and Advanced Technology Centre, Sowerby Building, BAE SYSTEMS, Filton FPC 267, Bristol BS34 7QW},
abstractNote = {Chemical vapor-synthesized carbon nanotubes are typically grown at temperatures around 600 deg. C. We report on the deployment of a titanium layer to help elevate the constraints on the substrate temperature during plasma-assisted growth. The growth is possible through the lowering of the hydrocarbon content used in the deposition, with the only source of heat provided by the plasma. The nanotubes synthesized have a small diameter distribution, which deviates from the usual trend that the diameter is determined by the thickness of the catalyst film. Simple thermodynamic simulations also show that the quantity of heat, that can be distributed, is determined by the thickness of the titanium layer. Despite the lower synthesis temperature, it is shown that this technique allows for high growth rates as well as better quality nanotubes.},
doi = {10.1063/1.2150587},
journal = {Applied Physics Letters},
number = 25,
volume = 87,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Dec 19 00:00:00 EST 2005},
month = {Mon Dec 19 00:00:00 EST 2005}
}
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