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Title: Magnetic-field-induced grain elongation in a medium carbon steel during its austenitic decomposition

Abstract

A 12-T magnetic field was applied during the austenitic decomposition in a medium plain carbon steel at a slow cooling rate. The magnetic field applied promotes proeutectoid ferrite grains to grow along the field direction and results in an elongated grain microstructure. The grain elongation is the result of the opposing contributions from the atomic dipolar interaction energy of Fe atoms and the interfacial energy.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ;  [1];  [2];  [3]
  1. School of Materials and Metallurgy, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110004 (China) and LETAM, CNRS-UMR 7078, University of Metz, Ile du Saulcy, 57045 Metz (France)
  2. (France)
  3. (China)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20706434
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Applied Physics Letters; Journal Volume: 87; Journal Issue: 21; Other Information: DOI: 10.1063/1.2133895; (c) 2005 American Institute of Physics; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; ATOMS; AUSTENITIC STEELS; CARBON STEELS; COOLING; CRYSTAL STRUCTURE; DECOMPOSITION; ELONGATION; FERRITE; GRAIN SIZE; MAGNETIC FIELDS; PHASE TRANSFORMATIONS; SURFACE ENERGY

Citation Formats

Zhang, Y.D., Esling, C., Muller, J., He, C.S., Zhao, X., Zuo, L., LETAM, CNRS-UMR 7078, University of Metz, Ile du Saulcy, 57045 Metz, and School of Materials and Metallurgy, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110004. Magnetic-field-induced grain elongation in a medium carbon steel during its austenitic decomposition. United States: N. p., 2005. Web. doi:10.1063/1.2133895.
Zhang, Y.D., Esling, C., Muller, J., He, C.S., Zhao, X., Zuo, L., LETAM, CNRS-UMR 7078, University of Metz, Ile du Saulcy, 57045 Metz, & School of Materials and Metallurgy, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110004. Magnetic-field-induced grain elongation in a medium carbon steel during its austenitic decomposition. United States. doi:10.1063/1.2133895.
Zhang, Y.D., Esling, C., Muller, J., He, C.S., Zhao, X., Zuo, L., LETAM, CNRS-UMR 7078, University of Metz, Ile du Saulcy, 57045 Metz, and School of Materials and Metallurgy, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110004. Mon . "Magnetic-field-induced grain elongation in a medium carbon steel during its austenitic decomposition". United States. doi:10.1063/1.2133895.
@article{osti_20706434,
title = {Magnetic-field-induced grain elongation in a medium carbon steel during its austenitic decomposition},
author = {Zhang, Y.D. and Esling, C. and Muller, J. and He, C.S. and Zhao, X. and Zuo, L. and LETAM, CNRS-UMR 7078, University of Metz, Ile du Saulcy, 57045 Metz and School of Materials and Metallurgy, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110004},
abstractNote = {A 12-T magnetic field was applied during the austenitic decomposition in a medium plain carbon steel at a slow cooling rate. The magnetic field applied promotes proeutectoid ferrite grains to grow along the field direction and results in an elongated grain microstructure. The grain elongation is the result of the opposing contributions from the atomic dipolar interaction energy of Fe atoms and the interfacial energy.},
doi = {10.1063/1.2133895},
journal = {Applied Physics Letters},
number = 21,
volume = 87,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Nov 21 00:00:00 EST 2005},
month = {Mon Nov 21 00:00:00 EST 2005}
}
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  • Abstract not provided.