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Title: Maintenance information: value added?

Abstract

A study of how well the mining industry uses information management systems for maintenance suggests there's plenty of room for improvement. The article presents results of a study of 13 mining and mineral processing operations over a four year period combined with a questionnaire completed by 91 attendees at seminars. None of the organizations had a well-defined, documented maintenance program and consequently were not able to use information effectively. Packaged information system providers did not recognise that industrial maintenance organizations had different information needs.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Paul D Tomlingson Associates, Denver, CO (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20701144
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Coal Age; Journal Volume: 110; Journal Issue: 11; Other Information: pdtmtc@sprynet.com
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
01 COAL, LIGNITE, AND PEAT; MAINTENANCE; INFORMATION SYSTEMS; TRAINING; MANAGEMENT; MINING; DATA ANALYSIS; PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT; PRODUCTION; INFORMATION NEEDS; PERFORMANCE; INFORMATION DISSEMINATION

Citation Formats

Tomlingson, P.D.. Maintenance information: value added?. United States: N. p., 2005. Web.
Tomlingson, P.D.. Maintenance information: value added?. United States.
Tomlingson, P.D.. Tue . "Maintenance information: value added?". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_20701144,
title = {Maintenance information: value added?},
author = {Tomlingson, P.D.},
abstractNote = {A study of how well the mining industry uses information management systems for maintenance suggests there's plenty of room for improvement. The article presents results of a study of 13 mining and mineral processing operations over a four year period combined with a questionnaire completed by 91 attendees at seminars. None of the organizations had a well-defined, documented maintenance program and consequently were not able to use information effectively. Packaged information system providers did not recognise that industrial maintenance organizations had different information needs.},
doi = {},
journal = {Coal Age},
number = 11,
volume = 110,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Nov 01 00:00:00 EST 2005},
month = {Tue Nov 01 00:00:00 EST 2005}
}
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