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Title: Technological change for sulfur dioxide scrubbers under market-based regulation

Abstract

The 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA) introduced tradable permits for controlling sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) emissions from coal-burning power plants and forced scrubbers to compete with other SO{sub 2} abatement options. While the flexibility of permits reduced overall compliance costs, a secondary benefit would exist if there were resulting advances in scrubber technology. A hedonic model is used to estimate the effect of changing regulatory regimes on scrubber costs. While scrubbers installed under the 1990 CAAA are cheaper to purchase and operate than older scrubbers, these cost reductions seem to be a one-time drop rather than a continual decline.

Authors:
;  [1]
  1. University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States). Dept. of Economics
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20700977
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Land Economics; Journal Volume: 81; Journal Issue: 4
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
01 COAL, LIGNITE, AND PEAT; 02 PETROLEUM; SULFUR DIOXIDE; FLUE GAS; DESULFURIZATION; COST; POLLUTION LAWS; POLLUTION REGULATIONS; SCRUBBERS; AIR POLLUTION CONTROL; USA

Citation Formats

Lange, I., and Bellas, A. Technological change for sulfur dioxide scrubbers under market-based regulation. United States: N. p., 2005. Web. doi:10.3368/le.81.4.546.
Lange, I., & Bellas, A. Technological change for sulfur dioxide scrubbers under market-based regulation. United States. doi:10.3368/le.81.4.546.
Lange, I., and Bellas, A. Tue . "Technological change for sulfur dioxide scrubbers under market-based regulation". United States. doi:10.3368/le.81.4.546.
@article{osti_20700977,
title = {Technological change for sulfur dioxide scrubbers under market-based regulation},
author = {Lange, I. and Bellas, A.},
abstractNote = {The 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA) introduced tradable permits for controlling sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) emissions from coal-burning power plants and forced scrubbers to compete with other SO{sub 2} abatement options. While the flexibility of permits reduced overall compliance costs, a secondary benefit would exist if there were resulting advances in scrubber technology. A hedonic model is used to estimate the effect of changing regulatory regimes on scrubber costs. While scrubbers installed under the 1990 CAAA are cheaper to purchase and operate than older scrubbers, these cost reductions seem to be a one-time drop rather than a continual decline.},
doi = {10.3368/le.81.4.546},
journal = {Land Economics},
number = 4,
volume = 81,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Nov 01 00:00:00 EST 2005},
month = {Tue Nov 01 00:00:00 EST 2005}
}
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