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Title: SCR comes of age

Abstract

The authors take a close look at selective catalytic reduction (SCR), which has become the predominant post-combustion technology for reducing emissions of nitrogen oxides (NOx) from utility boilers, both in the United States and worldwide. An added, unanticipated benefit of SCR technology is the enhancement of Hg removal in coal-fired power plants. However, additional work remains to be done in developing low-temperature catlysts, in-situ catalyst regeneration processes, and hybrid SNCR/SCR systems. 10 refs., 1 fig., 1 photo.

Authors:
; ;  [1]
  1. Parsons Corp. (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20700841
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: EM - Enviromental Manager; Other Information: al.mann@pp.netl.doe.gov
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
01 COAL, LIGNITE, AND PEAT; 20 FOSSIL-FUELED POWER PLANTS; SELECTIVE CATALYTIC REDUCTION; DENITRIFICATION; FLUE GAS; TECHNOLOGY ASSESSMENT; COAL; POLLUTION CONTROL EQUIPMENT; AIR POLLUTION CONTROL; MERCURY; AMMONIA; CATALYSTS; DEACTIVATION; REMOVAL; FOSSIL-FUEL POWER PLANTS

Citation Formats

Alfred Mann, Thomas Sarkus, and James Staudt. SCR comes of age. United States: N. p., 2005. Web.
Alfred Mann, Thomas Sarkus, & James Staudt. SCR comes of age. United States.
Alfred Mann, Thomas Sarkus, and James Staudt. Tue . "SCR comes of age". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_20700841,
title = {SCR comes of age},
author = {Alfred Mann and Thomas Sarkus and James Staudt},
abstractNote = {The authors take a close look at selective catalytic reduction (SCR), which has become the predominant post-combustion technology for reducing emissions of nitrogen oxides (NOx) from utility boilers, both in the United States and worldwide. An added, unanticipated benefit of SCR technology is the enhancement of Hg removal in coal-fired power plants. However, additional work remains to be done in developing low-temperature catlysts, in-situ catalyst regeneration processes, and hybrid SNCR/SCR systems. 10 refs., 1 fig., 1 photo.},
doi = {},
journal = {EM - Enviromental Manager},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Nov 01 00:00:00 EST 2005},
month = {Tue Nov 01 00:00:00 EST 2005}
}
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